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Lay- and J-day at Barbados Sailing Week

Bridgetown, Barbados (January 20, 2018) – While final preparations are underway for the Mount Gay Round Barbados Race tomorrow, the J/24 fleet crowned its winner in the closely contested final showdown in the J/24 Coastal Racing Series at Barbados Sailing Week.

J/24 racing in Barbados never fails to attract a quality fleet so it was no surprise that competition at the two-day J/24 series. Today, overnight leader Robbie Yearwood from Grenada and his team on Die Hard continued their form with wins in the two opening races.

However, a shredded jib halyard and spinnaker halyard in race three, while leading, almost cost them the series but they still managed fourth place in that race. Thankfully, they had done enough to secure the series with a race to spare, leaving Cyril Lecrenay and Bunga Bunga in second place just two points adrift.

“It was a tough day having to contend with gear problems but we gathered ourselves together and got it sorted,” said Yearwood. “It was a bit of a disaster not being able to take down the jib because we couldn’t have re-hoisted it, so we had to sail with it all the time plus we had to use jam cleats on the spinnaker halyard and tie it.

“There was so much tension that when we went to take the spinnaker down it at the end of the run when we were leading, it jammed and we sailed right past the mark. Funnily enough we didn’t actually have to sail the final race but we weren’t sure about our maths so we did it anyway, and really enjoyed it.”

Yearwood is now preparing the boat for the 134nm sail back to Grenada tomorrow. “Going home is easy because it’s all downwind but it will still take 24hour to get there.”

Elsewhere some competitors treated themselves to an afternoon of colonial indulgence at the specially laid on Regatta Surf & Turf Polo Match at Holders Polo Field, while others used the lay day to prepare for Barbados Sailing Week’s headline event – the Mount Gay Round Barbados Race.

This 60nm sprint around the Island of Barbados, which traditionally takes place on a public holiday to celebrate Errol Barrow Day (the birthday of the first Prime Minister of Barbados, and ‘father of independence), has sparked a lot of interest with many teams keen to have a serious attempt at breaking one of the 20 records and a chance to win their skipper’s weight in rum.

Its unique format has, over the last few years, attracted serious race teams using the event as a ‘warm up’ to the Caribbean race season. Leading the charge this year at the professional/performance end of the international entry list is CSQ, the 100ft multi-winged supermaxi from Australia skippered by Ludde Ingvall a former round the world yachtsman, world champion and record holder, who arrived in town yesterday.

Other high-powered speedsters ready for business tomorrow include Conviction, the Botin Carkeek-designed TP52 sailed by David Staples and team from the Barbados Offshore Sailing Syndicate (BOSS), also Bryn Palmer on his RC30 catamaran Silver Bullet, and the Windrider Rave Foiling Tri sailed by local entry Sebastian O’Hara.

Charles Trevor Hunte, the current holder of the Windsurfer record with a time of 5hrs, 34mins, 55secs, on a Starboard Phantom Batwing 377 raceboard has some competition this year with Frenchmen Fabrice Cornic on a Fanatic, and Frederic Vernhes on a Starboard Phantom hoping to break Hunte’s record domination.

With foiling all the rage it is not surprising that, for the first time ever in the history of this race, four foiling kitesurfers are taking part, which means there’ll be plenty of action around the coast for spectators.

Andreas Berg who sailed from Germany last year and broke the Singlehanded Monohull record is back to defend his title on his Dufour 44 Luna, and Mat Barker’s stunning Alfred Mylne 65 The Blue Peter will attempt to break the 6hr, 11min, 19secs Classic record.

The schooner and brigs contingent also sailing in the Classic category may be the slowest in the fleet, but the three imposing tall ships, for which this race was traditionally known, will grace the waters and provide a highlight for the thousands of spectators expected to gather at vantage points around the island.

Ruth, the locally built 33m schooner is a regular supporter of the race as is Tres Hombres, the 33m working brigantine that will be racing with a total of 20 barrels of rum on board. Fabian Klenner – captain of Tres Hombres – said he and his 14-strong crew are really looking forward to the race with an aim to finish.

“We have just loaded six barrels of rum from Barbados so we do have a bit more weight to carry,” said Klenner. “En-route here, we collected 14 barrels of rum from the Canary Islands and now we have six from Barbados. After this race we’ll be heading back to Den Helder in The Netherlands to deliver the goods.

“We have actually made it round the island once, the first year we were here about nine years ago but it does depend totally on the wind and current. Ideally we are looking for about Force 5 with relatively flat water so we can tack easily.”

Event organisers – Barbados Cruising Club in association with Barbados Tourism Marketing Inc – are also delighted to welcome STS Fryderyk Chopin from Poland, which at 54m, is the largest operating brigantine in the world and has a crew of over 50.

Making up the majority of the fleet, however, are the cruising and race boats including three J/24s, a Russian Mini Transat 6.50 and Whistler, the J/105 that won CSA Racing Coastal Series.

Racing begins at 0700 with staggered starts just off Barbados Cruising Club. The slowest boats (schooner and brigs) will start first, and fastest boat CQS will be last to start at 1130. From there on, the fleet will make its way around the Island clockwise and return across the finish line from the east in the afternoon.

An online tracker follow the race… click here.

Event websiteResultsFacebook

About Barbados Sailing Week
The first recorded race round Barbados was in 1936 when five trading schooners (Sea Fox, Mona Marie, Marion B Wolfe, Lucille Smith and Rhode Island) took up the challenge. Sea Fox (Captain Lou Kenedy) was the overall winner with a time of 10 hours 20 minutes.

The original race was based upon bragging rights for the fastest Trading Schooner. In an era where prices for cargo arriving ahead of rival ships commanded a massive premium, this was a lucrative race for captains.

The consolation prize of a barrel of Mount Gay Rum for the slowest yacht was discontinued several years later following the discovery that some competitors purposely stalled and remained out at sea for days to ensure they won the prize.

In 2012 The Mount Gay Round Barbados Race expanded to incorporate the Two Restaurants Race, which meant racing took place over two days. The idea proved such a success, it was decided to expand the event further in 2014, in line with most other Caribbean regattas, and run a series of coastal, round-the-buoy races including the Two Restaurants Race, and The Mount Gay Round Barbados Race.

The 60nm Mount Gay Round Barbados Race traditionally takes place on Errol Barrow Day (a public holiday to celebrate the birthday of the first Prime Minister of Barbados, and ‘father of independence). There are currently 20 records to contest.

The 265-mile Ocean Race from Barbados to Antigua at the end of the regatta was specifically designed to tie in with the start of the Superyacht Challenge in Antigua.

Source: Sue Pelling

Volvo Ocean Race: Closure for Leg 4

Team Sun Hung Kai/Scallywag have won Leg 4 of the Volvo Ocean Race, leading the fleet into their home port of Hong Kong on January 19.

Beginning on January 2, the 5,600 nautical mile course took the fleet up the east coast of Australia from Melbourne, into the Coral Sea and up north to the finish.

It’s a historic win for skipper David Witt and his team who had to overcome significant setbacks on the leg before grabbing the lead nearly a week ago with a bold tactical call out of the Doldrums.

“We had a bit of a plan and we stuck to it,” said Witt. “Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t and this time it worked for us.”

It was an extended Doldrums crossing, and Scallywag had moments where they appeared to be in a strong position.

But late in the crossing, after falling behind the fleet again, Witt and navigator Libby Greenhalgh made the decision to cut the corner, and turn to the west earlier than the opposition who kept pressing north in search of stronger winds.

It was expected for the teams to the north to overhaul Scallywag as the tradewinds filled in from the northeast, but it never happened. Full report.

Tragedy: Positioned to take second in the leg, Vestas 11th Hour Racing was involved in a collision with a commercial fishing vessel 30 nm from the finish. While the sailors were not harmed, ten people from the fishing vessel were thrown into the water leading to one fatality. Full report.

Chinese welcome: With Dongfeng Race Team passing Vestas for second place, it became a memorable 1-2 for Asian sponsored teams. Dongfeng went into Leg 4 without navigator Pascal Bidegorry, who stepped off due to injury and was replaced by Volvo Ocean Race winning skipper Franck Cammas at the navigation desk. Full story.

Podium complete: Team AkzoNobel scooped third position, the best finish yet for Simeon Tienpont’s crew, and comes after an extremely tight turnaround in Australia in which boat damage sustained in the Southern Ocean meant that the crew managed just a couple of days rest following a brutal Leg 3. Approaching the finish, AkzoNobel was diverted to support Vestas following their collision, but was later released to cross the finish line 17 days 21 hours and 6 seconds after departing Melbourne. Full report.

To see Leg 4 crew lists… click here.

The teams will leave Hong Kong on February 1 for a 100 nm non-scoring transitional Leg 5 to Guangzhou in China which will include a race in the In-Port Series. The teams will then return to Hong Kong for the start of the 6100 nm Leg 6 on February 7 to Auckland, New Zealand.

Race detailsTrackerScoreboardRace routeFacebookYouTube

Leg 4 – Final Results
1. Team Sun Hung Kai/Scallywag (HKG), David Witt (AUS), Finished on Jan 19 at 17:45:42 UTC
2. Dongfeng Race Team (CHN), Charles Caudrelier (FRA), Finished on Jan 19 at 20:33:22 UTC
3. Team AkzoNobel (NED), Simeon Tienpont (NED), Finished on Jan 20 at 00:21:16 UTC
4. MAPFRE (ESP), Xabi Fernández (ESP), Finished on Jan 20 at 01:51:10 UTC
5. Team Brunel (NED), Bouwe Bekking (NED), Finished on Jan 20 at 04:00:56 UTC
6. Turn the Tide on Plastic (POR), Dee Caffari (GBR), Finished on Jan 20 at 04:54:00 UTC
7. Vestas 11th Hour Racing (DEN/USA), Mark Towill (USA), Retired
DTF – Distance to Finish; DTL – Distance to Lead

Overall Results (after 4 of 11 legs)
1. MAPFRE (ESP), Xabi Fernández (ESP), 33 points
2. Dongfeng Race Team (CHN), Charles Caudrelier (FRA), 29
3. Vestas 11th Hour Racing (DEN/USA), Charlie Enright (USA), 23
4. Team Sun Hung Kai/Scallywag (HKG), David Witt (AUS), 19
5. Team Brunel (NED), Bouwe Bekking (NED), 17
6. Team AkzoNobel (NED), Simeon Tienpont (NED), 14
7. Turn the Tide on Plastic (POR), Dee Caffari (GBR), 8

2017-18 Edition: Entered Teams – Skippers
Team AkzoNobel (NED), Simeon Tienpont (NED)
Dongfeng Race Team (CHN), Charles Caudrelier (FRA)
MAPFRE (ESP), Xabi Fernández (ESP)
Vestas 11th Hour Racing (DEN/USA), Charlie Enright (USA)
Team Sun Hung Kai/Scallywag (HKG), David Witt (AUS)
Turn the Tide on Plastic (POR), Dee Caffari (GBR)
Team Brunel (NED), Bouwe Bekking (NED)

Background: Racing the one design Volvo Ocean 65, the 2017-18 Volvo Ocean Race begins in Alicante, Spain on October 22 2017 with the final finish in The Hague, Netherlands on June 30 2018. In total, the 11-leg race will visit 12 cities in six continents: Alicante, Lisbon, Cape Town, Melbourne, Hong Kong, Guangzhou, Auckland, Itajaí, Newport, Cardiff, Gothenburg, and The Hague. A maximum of eight teams will compete.

Source: Volvo Ocean Race

Volvo Ocean Race: The blame game

For the first time in the history of the Volvo Ocean Race, a leg would take the fleet to Hong Kong, the former British colony in southeastern China. A 5,600 nautical mile course, beginning January 2, directed the seven teams up the east coast of Australia from Melbourne, into the Coral Sea and up north to the finish.

The course was fraught with obstacles. Many reefs and atolls, some not well mapped, kept navigators busy, but it was the final approach that would lead to disaster. As one of the world’s busiest port cities, the waters also serve a massive fishing community.

The Volvo Ocean Race began having stops with the 2008-9 contest, with sailors finding poorly lit fishing fleets in their path. While no collisions had previously occurred, tearing through fishing nets would prove to be a problem.

And now, with the fourth edition of the race to approach this hornet’s nest, there’s been a fatality. Here’s the report from Xinhua News Agency, the official press agency of the People’s Republic of China.
—————-
A local hospital in China’s Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR) confirmed on Saturday (Jan. 20) that a man died after his fishing boat’s collision with a sailing yacht competing in Volvo Ocean Race.

The Chinese mainland-registered fishing boat sunk after colliding with the vessel of American- Danish team Vestas 11th Hour Racing at about 2:30 a.m. local time. Ten fishermen fell into the sea and nine of them were rescued by a mainland rescue vessel with one missing.

The missing fisherman was later saved to the yacht but went unconscious. The Government Flying Service of the Hong Kong SAR sent a helicopter to take the fisherman to Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital which declared his death at around 6:30 a.m..

An officer with the Government Flying Service told Xinhua that they received an emergency call at 2:37 a.m. from Hong Kong Maritime Rescue Coordination Center which reported the collision and claimed the missing fisherman.

The Government Flying Service then dispatched a helicopter to the collision venue, and found that the missing fisherman was saved by the sailing yacht.

Before the collision, the sailing yacht was competing in the fourth leg (Melbourne to Hong Kong) of the around-the-world race and had only 30 nautical miles left to finish.

According to the organizer of the race, all of the crew members of the yacht were safe with limited damage to their boat, and sent SOS radio signal for the fishing boat as well as helped with the rescue after collision.

The organizer expressed their deepest condolences to the family of the victim and promised full cooperation with investigation of Hong Kong authority. Hong Kong police said they are investigating the collision.
—————-
While it is the commercial component that brings the Volvo Ocean Race to this Asian city, Race Organizers now must deal with the consequences of this decision. With the tracker reporting Vestas was traveling at 20 knots in winds of 23 knots, this team was unable to find a clear path to the finish.

“The death of the fisherman rests squarely on the shoulders of the Race Organizers,” contends Tim Patterson, an avid Scuttlebutt reader. “The sailors are risking their lives to do this race, there is no reason to risk the lives of others.”

Vestas, which was positioned to finish second in the race, retired after the incident. This is the second team the Danish energy company has sponsored in the race, with the previous 2014-15 effort suffering significant damage after colliding with a reef in the Indian Ocean.

To see Leg 4 crew lists… click here.

Race detailsTrackerScoreboardRace routeFacebookYouTube

Overall Results (after 3 of 11 legs)
1. MAPFRE (ESP), Xabi Fernández (ESP), 29 points
2. Dongfeng Race Team (CHN), Charles Caudrelier (FRA), 23
3. Vestas 11th Hour Racing (DEN/USA), Charlie Enright (USA), 23
4. Team Brunel (NED), Bouwe Bekking (NED), 14
5. Team Sun Hung Kai/Scallywag (HKG), David Witt (AUS), 11
6. Team AkzoNobel (NED), Simeon Tienpont (NED), 9
7. Turn the Tide on Plastic (POR), Dee Caffari (GBR), 6

2017-18 Edition: Entered Teams – Skippers
Team AkzoNobel (NED), Simeon Tienpont (NED)
Dongfeng Race Team (CHN), Charles Caudrelier (FRA)
MAPFRE (ESP), Xabi Fernández (ESP)
Vestas 11th Hour Racing (DEN/USA), Charlie Enright (USA)
Team Sun Hung Kai/Scallywag (HKG), David Witt (AUS)
Turn the Tide on Plastic (POR), Dee Caffari (GBR)
Team Brunel (NED), Bouwe Bekking (NED)

Background: Racing the one design Volvo Ocean 65, the 2017-18 Volvo Ocean Race begins in Alicante, Spain on October 22 2017 with the final finish in The Hague, Netherlands on June 30 2018. In total, the 11-leg race will visit 12 cities in six continents: Alicante, Lisbon, Cape Town, Melbourne, Hong Kong, Guangzhou, Auckland, Itajaí, Newport, Cardiff, Gothenburg, and The Hague. A maximum of eight teams will compete.

Source: Volvo Ocean Race

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Tragedy strikes Volvo Ocean Race

Hong Kong (January 20, 2018) – The Volvo Ocean Race can confirm Vestas 11th Hour Racing, one of the teams competing in the 2017-18 race, has been involved in a collision with a non-race vessel before the finish of Leg 4, near Hong Kong.

The team, which was 30 nm from the finish, has retired from Leg 4 and is proceeding to Hong Kong unassisted and under its own power.

Race Control at Volvo Ocean Race headquarters was informed of the collision by the team moments after it happened at approximately 17:23 UTC on Friday January 19, 2018 (01:23 local time on Saturday morning).

The Vestas 11th Hour Racing team issued a Mayday distress call on behalf of the other vessel, alerting the Hong Kong Marine Rescue Coordination Centre (HKMRCC) and undertook a search and rescue mission.

HKMRCC informed Race Control that a commercial vessel in the area was able to rescue nine of the crew and that a tenth crew member was taken by helicopter to hospital. HKMRCC has since confirmed the death of the air-lifted crew member.

Dongfeng Race Team skipper Charles Caudrelier, which was chasing Vestas in the final miles, was in a sober mood as they claimed second place. “Our first thought is that this is terrible news,” noted Caudrelier. “It is always very dangerous when sailing in these fishing areas when there are so many boats and some have no lights. Obviously this is very bad news for these fisherman, the Volvo Ocean Race and for Vestas.”

Volvo Ocean Race and Vestas 11th Hour Racing are now focused on providing immediate support to those affected by this incident. All involved organisations are co-operating with the authorities and are fully supporting the ongoing investigation.

All of the crew on Vestas 11th Hour Racing are safe. Their boat suffered damage and the team has officially retired from the leg, but the team is able to motor to shore.

Beginning on January 2, Leg 4 is a 5,600 nautical mile race up the east coast of Australia from Melbourne, into the Coral Sea and up north to Hong Kong.

To see Leg 4 crew lists… click here.

Race detailsTrackerScoreboardRace routeFacebookYouTube

Overall Results (after 3 of 11 legs)
1. MAPFRE (ESP), Xabi Fernández (ESP), 29 points
2. Dongfeng Race Team (CHN), Charles Caudrelier (FRA), 23
3. Vestas 11th Hour Racing (DEN/USA), Charlie Enright (USA), 23
4. Team Brunel (NED), Bouwe Bekking (NED), 14
5. Team Sun Hung Kai/Scallywag (HKG), David Witt (AUS), 11
6. Team AkzoNobel (NED), Simeon Tienpont (NED), 9
7. Turn the Tide on Plastic (POR), Dee Caffari (GBR), 6

2017-18 Edition: Entered Teams – Skippers
Team AkzoNobel (NED), Simeon Tienpont (NED)
Dongfeng Race Team (CHN), Charles Caudrelier (FRA)
MAPFRE (ESP), Xabi Fernández (ESP)
Vestas 11th Hour Racing (DEN/USA), Charlie Enright (USA)
Team Sun Hung Kai/Scallywag (HKG), David Witt (AUS)
Turn the Tide on Plastic (POR), Dee Caffari (GBR)
Team Brunel (NED), Bouwe Bekking (NED)

Background: Racing the one design Volvo Ocean 65, the 2017-18 Volvo Ocean Race begins in Alicante, Spain on October 22 2017 with the final finish in The Hague, Netherlands on June 30 2018. In total, the 11-leg race will visit 12 cities in six continents: Alicante, Lisbon, Cape Town, Melbourne, Hong Kong, Guangzhou, Auckland, Itajaí, Newport, Cardiff, Gothenburg, and The Hague. A maximum of eight teams will compete.

Source: Volvo Ocean Race

Vestas collision behind Scallywag win

Hong Kong (January 19, 2018; Leg 4; Day 18) – Team Sun Hung Kai/Scallywag have won Leg 4 of the Volvo Ocean Race, leading the fleet into their home port of Hong Kong.

It’s a historic win for skipper David Witt and his team who had to overcome significant setbacks on the leg before grabbing the lead with a bold tactical call out of the Doldrums last weekend.

“We had a bit of a plan and we stuck to it,” said Witt. “Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t and this time it worked for us.”

It was an extended Doldrums crossing, and Scallywag had moments where they appeared to be in a strong position.

But late in the crossing, after falling behind the fleet again, Witt and navigator Libby Greenhalgh made the decision to cut the corner, and turn to the west earlier than the opposition who kept pressing north in search of stronger winds.

The move paid dividends nearly immediately on the leaderboard as Scallywag had less miles to sail to the finish line, but pundits cautioned that the teams in the north would almost certainly overhaul them as the tradewinds filled in from the northeast.

It never happened.

Even when the team dropped miles recovering a man overboard after Alex Gough was swept off the boat by a wave, after executing a flawless recovery, Scallywag returned to racing and extended to nearly a 100-mile lead.

But then, the chasing boats began chipping away at the lead. Two days out from the finish, the margin had been cut significantly and the pressure mounted.

“I was really impressed by the way we operated over the past couple of days,” Witt said. “We had a pretty big lead and then through no fault of our own, about two-thirds of it got taken away. But we stuck to our guns, did what we thought was right and it’s worked out.”

With the Leg 4 win, Scallywag picks up 8 points (7 points for first place plus a one point win bonus). It will vault the team up to mid-fleet on the overall leaderboard, in a very respectable fourth place.

“It was always going to take us longer than the others to get up to speed as we were the last to enter,” Witt said. “All teams need a bit of confidence and I think one thing that is underrated in sport is momentum and this will certainly give the Scallywags plenty of that… We’re all still learning and we’re going to keep getting better as we go on.”

Witt has acknowledged the significance of the win as the local team leading the fleet into the first ever Volvo Ocean Race stopover in Hong Kong. For the team owner, Seng Huang Lee, who has supported Scallywag sailing over the years, it’s a big moment.

“We’re a privately owned team and our owner Mr. Lee has poured his passion and enthusiasm and vision into this project and this win will be very special for him… Winning this leg will be a massive platform for Scallywag going forward.”

Behind Scallywag, Vestas 11th Hour Racing and Dongfeng Race Team were battling for second until Vesta informed race control at approximately 17:39 UTC that they had been involved in a collision with another vessel approximately 30 miles from the finish.

The crew reports to be safe, and while the damage is said to be limited, they appear to be struggling on the tracker, giving way for Dongfeng to take second.

To see Leg 4 crew lists… click here.

Race detailsTrackerScoreboardRace routeFacebookYouTube

Leg 4 – Position Report (21:08 UTC)
1. Team Sun Hung Kai/Scallywag (HKG), David Witt (AUS), Finished on Jan 19 at 17:45:42 UTC
2. Dongfeng Race Team (CHN), Charles Caudrelier (FRA), Finished on Jan 19 at 20:33:22 UTC
3. Vestas 11th Hour Racing (DEN/USA), Mark Towill (USA), 30.1 nm DTF
4. Team AkzoNobel (NED), Simeon Tienpont (NED), 12.3 nm DTL
5. MAPFRE (ESP), Xabi Fernández (ESP), 64.4 nm DTL
6. Team Brunel (NED), Bouwe Bekking (NED), 101.2 nm DTL
7. Turn the Tide on Plastic (POR), Dee Caffari (GBR), 114.4 nm DTL
DTF – Distance to Finish; DTL – Distance to Lead

Beginning on January 2, Leg 4 is a 5,600 nautical mile race up the east coast of Australia from Melbourne, into the Coral Sea and up north to Hong Kong.

Overall Results (after 3 of 11 legs)
1. MAPFRE (ESP), Xabi Fernández (ESP), 29 points
2. Dongfeng Race Team (CHN), Charles Caudrelier (FRA), 23
3. Vestas 11th Hour Racing (DEN/USA), Charlie Enright (USA), 23
4. Team Brunel (NED), Bouwe Bekking (NED), 14
5. Team Sun Hung Kai/Scallywag (HKG), David Witt (AUS), 11
6. Team AkzoNobel (NED), Simeon Tienpont (NED), 9
7. Turn the Tide on Plastic (POR), Dee Caffari (GBR), 6

2017-18 Edition: Entered Teams – Skippers
Team AkzoNobel (NED), Simeon Tienpont (NED)
Dongfeng Race Team (CHN), Charles Caudrelier (FRA)
MAPFRE (ESP), Xabi Fernández (ESP)
Vestas 11th Hour Racing (DEN/USA), Charlie Enright (USA)
Team Sun Hung Kai/Scallywag (HKG), David Witt (AUS)
Turn the Tide on Plastic (POR), Dee Caffari (GBR)
Team Brunel (NED), Bouwe Bekking (NED)

Background: Racing the one design Volvo Ocean 65, the 2017-18 Volvo Ocean Race begins in Alicante, Spain on October 22 2017 with the final finish in The Hague, Netherlands on June 30 2018. In total, the 11-leg race will visit 12 cities in six continents: Alicante, Lisbon, Cape Town, Melbourne, Hong Kong, Guangzhou, Auckland, Itajaí, Newport, Cardiff, Gothenburg, and The Hague. A maximum of eight teams will compete.

Source: Volvo Ocean Race

America’s Cup: Writing the AC75 Rule

After unveiling the concept of yachts to be raced in the 36th America’s Cup in 2021, Team New Zealand now face the arduous task of turning a concept into a rule.

The design for the 75 foot fully-foiling monohull vessels was revealed in November last year, with the design moving away from the catamarans raced in the 2017 regatta.

However, the reigning America’s Cup holders, alongside challenger of record Luna Rossa, must now create a set of regulations that will ensure that each team designs and builds boats that fit the general concept presented.

At the same time, these regulations need to allow designers enough freedom to allow the new class to develop competitively. It’s a testing task, but a vital one in the America’s Cup, Team New Zealand design coordinator Dan Bernasconi said.

“In some ways, designers would love to work without the constraints of a rule, but in practice it’s important to have a comprehensive set of constraints to keep costs under control,” Bernasconi said. “If no limits were set, the wealthiest teams could gain advantages by out-spending their competitors using rare materials, extremely complex systems, and countless iterations of components.”

Rules are needed for the overall parameters of the vessels including length, weight and sail area. They then have to go into specifics on materials, the types of appendages permitted, hydraulic and electronic control systems – covering every aspect of the design.

The process is currently about halfway through, with the rule issue date of March 31 fast approaching. About 12 designers from both Team New Zealand and Luna Rossa are working together to pool ideas and turn concepts and systems into words on a page.

Other interested challengers are kept up to date as the process progresses, with questions regarding the rule being answered and all feedback being taken under advisement.

The need to meet the March 31 deadline is important, and a number of possible challengers will want know the set rules before paying their US$1 million entry fee by the June 30 entry cut-off later this year.

Source: NZ Herald

World on Water Global Sailing News – January 19, 2018

This week’s “World on Water” global sailing news show produced by www.boatson.tv.

In this week’s “WoW TV”:
• David Witt and his crew of Scallywags come out of “stealth mode” and with under 400 miles to Hong Kong they are sailing like never before but it is tight. They will finish today.
• Australian moths at Wangi and all the heavies turn out to fly.
• The final day of the Royal Langkawi Regatta.
• Pittwater to Coffs Harbour race review.
• The Clipper Race within the Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race.
• Musto Skiff World Championships.

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