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Satana ransomware encrypts user files and master boot record

Attackers are developing an aggressive new ransomware program for Windows machines that encrypts user files as well as the computer's master boot record (MBR), leaving devices unable to load the OS.

The program is dubbed Satana -- meaning "Satan" in Italian and Romanian -- and, according to researchers from security firm Malwarebytes, it is functional but still under development.

Satana is the second ransomware threat affecting the MBR and seems inspired by another program, Petya, that appeared in March.

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Study reveals security gap in big data projects

Ideally, the ultimate output of big-data analysis can provide a company with a valuable competitive advantage. But those results aren’t getting much additional security, according to an IDG Enterprise study of big-data initiatives.

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(Insider Story)
DNC hacker Guccifer 2.0 denies Russian links, mocks security firms

The hacker who claims to have breached the Democratic National Committee’s networks is trying to beat back accusations that he’s linked with the Russian government.

The intrusion, which stole confidential files from the DNC, was his “personal project,” hacker Guccifer 2.0 said in a Thursday blog post.

Security firms and the DNC may be trying to blame the attack on Russia, but “they can prove nothing!” Guccifer 2.0 added.

“All I hear is blah-blah-blah, unfounded theories, and somebody’s estimates,” he wrote.

Guccifer 2.0 appeared on the web just a day after the DNC revealed it had been hacked. To prove he was behind the breach, the hacker began posting the files he stole. This included opposition research on presidential candidate Donald Trump, along with donor lists and foreign policy files. 

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Hackers are coming for your healthcare records -- here’s why

Data stolen from a bank quickly becomes useless once the breach is discovered and passcodes are changed. But data from the healthcare industry, which includes both personal identities and medical histories, can live a lifetime.

Cyberattacks will cost hospitals more than $305 billion over the next five years and one in 13 patients will have their data compromised by a hack, according to industry consultancy Accenture.

cyber security hackers healthcare patient data Accenture

And a study by the Brookings Institution predicts that one in four data breaches this year will hit the healthcare industry.

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Time is short to stop expansion of FBI hacking, senator says

Congress is running out of time to stop proposed changes in federal court rules that will expand the FBI's authority to hack into computers during criminal investigations, a senator said Thursday.

The rule changes allowing expanded FBI searches of computers, approved by the Supreme Court in April, go into effect in December unless Congress votes against them, and getting Congress to move in a contentious election year will be difficult, said Senator Ron Wyden, an Oregon Democrat and a critic of the changes.

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DDoS botnets built using Linux malware for embedded devices

LizardStresser, the DDoS malware for Linux systems written by the infamous Lizard Squad attacker group, was used over the past year to create over 100 botnets, some built almost exclusively from compromised Internet-of-Things devices.

LizardStresser has two components: A client that runs on hacked Linux-based machines and a server used by attackers to control the clients. It can launch several types of distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks, execute shell commands and propagate to other systems over the telnet protocol by trying default or hard-coded credentials.

The code for LizardStresser was published online in early 2015, giving less-skilled attackers an easy way to build new DDoS botnets of their own. The number of unique LizardStresser command-and-control servers has steadily increased since then, especially this year, reaching over 100 by June, according to researchers from DDoS mitigation provider Arbor Networks.

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Security Sessions: Is hospital security on life support?
In this episode of Security Sessions, CSO Editor-in-Chief Joan Goochild speaks with Ted Harrington from Independent Security Evaluators about how vulnerable hospitals are in protecting patient health.
Mingis on Tech: The ethics of self-driving cars -- and killer robots
If your autonomous car has to decide who lives -- you or the people it's heading for on the highway -- who should it save? Executive Editor Ken Mingis, Senior Writer Lucas Mearian and Multimedia Editor Keith Shaw drive the conversation.
Terror-suspect database used by banks, governments, has been leaked

A database described by some as a "terrorism blacklist" has fallen into the hands of a white-hat hacker who may decide to make it accessible to the public online.

The database, called World-Check, belongs to Thomson Reuters and is used by banks, governments and intelligence agencies to screen people for criminal ties and links to terrorism.

Security researcher Chris Vickery claims to have obtained a 2014 copy of the database. He announced the details on Tuesday in a post on Reddit.

"No hacking was involved in my acquisition of this data," he wrote. "I would call it more of a leak than anything, although not directly from Thomson Reuters."

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Five free Android apps for recording voice notes
When you're on the go and you need to take a quick note or two, you don't want to have to type it on your Android keyboard. The tools on this list offer a better alternative.
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