Login
Password
Sources on this Page

> Headlines by Category

 Home / Technology / Security / Authentication & Encryption

You are using the plain HTML view, switch to advanced view for a more complete experience.

Analysts laud and lance new Microsoft browser armor

Analysts today gave mixed reviews to Microsoft's new security model for its Edge browser, labeling it as both a landmark move and an attempt to mask the underlying problems of Windows that the company has refused to address.

"This is one of those ideas where you say, 'Why didn't someone do this before?'" said Patrick Moorhead, principal analyst of Moor Insights & Strategy.

Moorhead was talking about Windows Defender Application Guard, a new security feature that will roll out to some enterprise customers next year. Only organizations that subscribe to Windows Enterprise E3 or E5 -- plans under which businesses pay an annual fee to run the operating system -- will be offered Application Guard.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Six senators demand more details about the Yahoo data breach

Six U.S. senators have called Yahoo's massive data breach "unacceptable," and they're demanding that the company provide more details about the incident.

In a letter addressed to Yahoo's CEO, the lawmakers said they were particularly "disturbed" that the breach occurred in 2014, but that Yahoo publicized it only last week.

"That means millions of Americans' data may have been compromised for two years," the letter said. "This is unacceptable."

The hacking incident, which Yahoo said it only learned recently, affects at least 500 million user accounts, making it perhaps the largest known data breach in history. Account information, including email addresses, telephone numbers and hashed passwords, may have been stolen.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Swift CEO details three more failed attacks on banking network

Banks stopped three new attempts to abuse the Swift financial transfer network this summer, its CEO Gottfried Leibbrandt said Monday, as he announced Swift's plan to impose tighter security controls on its customers.

Swift provides the network that banks use to exchange funds internationally, and hit the headlines in February when attackers almost got away with a billion-dollar heist at Bangladesh Bank. In the end, they only succeeded in stealing US$81 million after hacking bank systems connected to the Swift network.

That prompted Swift to ratchet up security around its systems, which weren't themselves breached, updating the software it provides banks and adding new audit and verification tools.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Your users have porous passwords? Blame yourself, IT.

Maybe IT needs to tone down its security awareness efforts. New research by psychologists into password strength delivered the non-intuitive conclusion that users who are well briefed on the severity of security threats will not, as IT had hoped, create stronger passwords to better protect themselves.

They actually tend to create much weaker passwords because the briefings make them feel helpless, as if any efforts to defend against these threats are pointless.

The research, from a Montclair State University study — detailed here in a story from The Atlantic — suggests that IT staffers need to make sure that they emphasize how powerful a defense passwords, PINs and secure phrases can be in defending against threats, at least until we are able to deploy better authenticators.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Yahoo's claim of 'state-sponsored' hackers meets with skepticism

Yahoo has blamed its massive data breach on a "state-sponsored actor." But the company isn't saying why it arrived at that conclusion. Nor has it provided any evidence.

The lingering questions are causing some security experts to wonder why Yahoo isn't offering more details on a hack that stole account information from 500 million users.

"I think there's a lot of fishiness going on here," said Michael Lipinski, the chief security strategist at Securonix, which sells a security-analytics platform.

Yahoo didn't respond to a request for comment. The company has protocols in place that can detect state-sponsored hacking into user accounts. In a December 2015 blog post, the company outlined its policy, saying it will warn users when this is suspected. 

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

34% off Master Lock Bluetooth Keyless Outdoor Padlock - Deal Alert

Use your smartphone to open this padlock from Master Lock. Share access, monitor access history and receive alerts if someone is tampering. Designed for outdoor use, its shackle offers 2 inch vertical clearance and is made of boron for maximum resistance to cutting and sawing. The lock features alternate methods of access for when Bluetooth isn't available or the replaceable battery dies. Its typical list price of $89 has been reduced 34% to $59 (see on Amazon). An indoor version is available, also at a discount (28% off, $50 -- See on Amazon).

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Post Selected Items to:

Showing 10 items of 136

home  •   advertising  •   terms of service  •   privacy  •   about us  •   contact us  •   press release design by Popshop •   Official PR partner PRNews.io •   © 1999-2016 NewsKnowledge