Login
Password
Sources on this Page

> Headlines by Category

 Home / Technology / Security / Authentication & Encryption

You are using the plain HTML view, switch to advanced view for a more complete experience.

iCloud security: How (and why) to enable two-factor authentication

Given that so many of the details of our digital lives are either with us (on our smartphones) or easily accessible (via the web), you should be doing everything you can to protect that information and data. On iPhones and iPads, data is largely kept in a vault, sealed behind strong encryption and (hopefully) a strong password. Even if the device is lost or stolen, chances are good that encryption will keep data safe. (That vault is secure enough to frustrate even the FBI.)

Although iOS devices are designed and built to be secure, data is also stored and accessible online. With security breaches occurring routinely, your data is vulnerable to anyone in the world with an internet connection and a halfway decent browser. If a breach occurs and thieves gain access to your email and password, they can easily reset any account linked to that email, change the password, and lock you out of your own data.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Find My Device: How Android's security service can manage your missing phone

Losing your phone is one of the most stressful predicaments of modern-day life. We've all been there: You pat your pocket, swiftly scan every surface in sight — then suddenly feel your heart drop at the realization that your Android device and all of its contents are no longer in your control.

There's certainly no scenario in which losing your phone is a good thing. But with the advanced security tools now built into Android on the operating system level, finding and managing a missing device is often — well, quite manageable. And you don't need any third-party software to do it.

Android's native Find My Device system can precisely pinpoint any Android device — phone, tablet, even Android TV box (if you somehow manage to misplace one of those?!). It'll show you the device's exact location on an interactive map and give you tools to remotely ring it, lock it or wipe it entirely and send all of its data to the digital beyond.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Where’s the KB 4034661 jumbo bug fix for Win10 Anniversary Update?

On Wednesday night, Microsoft claims it issued KB 4034661 for Windows 10 Anniversary Update, bringing version 1607 up to build 14393.1613. It was supposed to go out the Automatic Update chute. But as of early Thursday morning, U.S. time, nobody’s seen it. There may be a good reason why. Or maybe not. Such are the vagaries of patching Windows.

It’s a laundry-list patch, rolling out on a Wednesday (or Thursday, or …), nine days after the regular Patch Tuesday patch, KB 4034658 wiped out the Update History on many Windows 10 Anniversary Update machines. The KB 4034661 article lists dozens of small bug fixes (that’s “quality improvements” in Microsoft Speak).

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

8 steps to install Windows 10 patches like a pro
31% off WD 4TB My Passport Portable External USB 3.0 Hard Drive - Deal Alert

Safely store massive amounts of photos, videos and music with this 4TB external drive from WD. It comes equipped with WD Backup software so you can automatically back up photos, videos, music and documents on your preferred schedule. And built-in 256-bit AES hardware encryption with WD Security software helps keep your content private and safe. The 4TB My Passport model is currently priced just $10 higher than its 3TB counterpart with this 31% off deal. See it now on Amazon.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Where we stand with this month’s Windows and Office security patches

One week after Patch Tuesday, and would-be Windows Updaters are facing a handful of bugs. Some will find them minor annoyances. Others … not so much. Here are the known bugs, and where we stand in the struggle to resolve the problems.

Worthy of note: Microsoft is now acknowledging many bugs that in the past would’ve gone without comment. There’s hope.

Here are the known, significant buggy security patches:

  • Windows 10 Anniversary Update, version 1607 – Cumulative update KB 4034658 wipes out Update History, unhides hidden updates, and effectively disconnects some updated computers from WSUS. Microsoft has acknowledged all three of those bugs in the KB 4034658 article with the usual “Microsoft is investigating this issue and will provide an update as soon as possible.”
  • The first undocumented buggy driver this month for the Surface Pro 4, “Surface - System - 7/21/2017 12:00:00 AM - 1.0.65.1,” was released on August 1. It was replaced by a second driver “Surface – System – 7/31/2007 12:00:00 AM - 1.0.75.1” on August 4. The second one was documented. But then we saw four more undocumented Surface Pro 4 drivers — “Intel driver update for Intel(r) Dynamic Platform and Thermal Framework Generic Participant,” “Power Participant,” Processor Participant” and “Manager” — all released on Saturday, August 12. Sometime late on August 14, Microsoft posted information about two of the drivers.
  • Both the Windows 7 August Monthly rollup KB 4034664 and the manually installed security-only patch KB 4034679 are causing problems with two-screen systems: The second screen starts showing gibberish with many applications, including Office. The problem has been widely reported — even replicated with a Proof of Concept program — but Microsoft hasn’t yet acknowledged it.
  • The only bug reported by Microsoft in its August Windows 7 security patches is an old bug, continuing from July, in which a buggy LDAP plugs up TCP dynamic ports. That bug hasn’t been fixed.
  • The Windows 8.1 Monthly rollup listing mentions a known bug: NPS authentication may break, and wireless clients may fail to connect. The solution is to manually set a registry entry on the server.

Dozens of patches were made to Office earlier this month but, so far, I’m not aware of any bugs.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Another undocumented Surface Pro update — Dynamic Platform and Thermal Framework

If you own a Surface Pro 2017, you may have seen three or more new, completely undocumented driver updates come down the Automatic Update chute over the weekend. They’re called “Intel driver update for Intel(r) Dynamic Platform and Thermal Framework Generic Participant,” “Power Participant,” “Processor Participant” and, for some, “Manager.”

The timing couldn’t be worse, as Microsoft tries to counter the impression, championed by Consumer Reports, that Surface machines can no longer be “Recommended” to laptop buyers.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Post Selected Items to:

Showing 10 items of 40

home  •   advertising  •   terms of service  •   privacy  •   about us  •   contact us  •   press release design by Popshop •   © 1999-2017 NewsKnowledge