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Daily Quiz for August 18, 2017

On February 19, 1881 Kansas banned the sale of this.

The post Daily Quiz for August 18, 2017 appeared first on HistoryNet.

Wild West Reviews: Red Cloud

Red Cloud: Warrior-Statesman of the Lakota Sioux (1997, by RobertW. Larson)  This compelling biography of one of the most fascinating 19th-century Indian leaders is suited to both Wild West scholars and the general reading public. Red Cloud is arguably as significant a figure in Lakota history as Sitting Bull or Crazy Horse, although the latter …

The post Wild West Reviews: Red Cloud appeared first on HistoryNet.

Packing Iron in the Real Old West Differed From the Way It Was Done in the Movies

Gun leather on the frontier was not designed for fast shooting. For well over a century now a caricature of a cowboy dressed in batwing or woolly chaps, boots, Stetson and holstered six-gun slung low on the hip has been the stereotypical, symbolic, worldwide image of the United States. But in reality, a low-slung holster …

The post Packing Iron in the Real Old West Differed From the Way It Was Done in the Movies appeared first on HistoryNet.

The Industry That Won the Frontier West Gets Its Due at a Colorado Springs Museum

The Western Museum of Mining & Industry is easy to dig. Gold! Exclaim that word to any Old West aficionado and his thoughts will usually turn to the nuggets James Marshall discovered in the South Fork of the American River near Sutter’s Mill— the impetus, after word got out, behind the California Gold Rush. While …

The post The Industry That Won the Frontier West Gets Its Due at a Colorado Springs Museum appeared first on HistoryNet.

Ghost Town: Coloma, California

In 1845 James Marshall took a carpentry job with John Sutter, later constructing a sawmill to supply lumber for Sutter’s ambitious project—a colony he called New Helvetia (present-day Sacramento, Calif., and environs) after his native Switzerland. Alta California Governor Juan Bautista Alvarado had granted Sutter nearly 50,000 acres for his colony. Marshall sited the sawmill …

The post Ghost Town: Coloma, California appeared first on HistoryNet.

Stocking Full of Frontier Adventure

Clark B. Stocking put his life on the line many times as a soldier, scout, sheriff ’s deputy and shotgun messenger, yet he survived well into the 20th century and got a third chance with his first love. Most men went West during the California Gold Rush either to line their own pockets or to …

The post Stocking Full of Frontier Adventure appeared first on HistoryNet.

Bat Masterson’s Emma

Although Emma Masterson largely kept to the background while married to the famous former frontier lawman, she had led a sporting life with her fleet-footed first husband. William Barclay Masterson, best known simply as “Bat,” was a frontier legend when he left the West behind in the early 20th century. He was working in Manhattan …

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Love and the Bandit’s Head

Harry Love knew it wasn’t practical for his California Rangers to bring in all of the late Joaquín Murrieta—so they just brought in his head. He stepped off the riverboat’s gangplank onto the levee, the crowd surging around him. All were headed toward Front (or First) Street in the river town of Sacramento, gateway to …

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Red Cloud and the Bull Bear Shooting

Oglala warrior Red Cloud rose to prominence after killing his rival, only to face the inherent perils of leadership in the win-or-die Lakota culture. “Politics,” to quote humorist Finley Peter Dunne from an 1895 newspaper column, ain’t beanbag,” which is an understatement when applied to the reality of Lakota tribal politics in the 19th-century American …

The post Red Cloud and the Bull Bear Shooting appeared first on HistoryNet.

The Hot Lake Sanatorium Was Hot During the Heyday of Healing Waters

People flocked to the Oregon resort-spa-hospital in the 1920s. At the turn of the 20th century a talented physician named William T. Phy moved to Hot Lake, a tiny northeastern Oregon town named for nearby hot springs. In the ensuing decades he would capitalize on the hot springs’ reputed healing powers to transform the existing …

The post The Hot Lake Sanatorium Was Hot During the Heyday of Healing Waters appeared first on HistoryNet.

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