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When did America Announce that it was Winning WWII?

At what point, during WWII, would newspaper or radio news have informed the rural mid-america population that the Allies were winning the war?   ???   Dear Anonymous, From the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor onward, American newspaper and radio journalists reported whatever events occurred to the best of their abilities, but tended to play …

The post When did America Announce that it was Winning WWII? appeared first on HistoryNet.

Daily Quiz for February 28, 2017

A chocolate bar melting in a scientist’s pocket lead to this invention in 1945.

The post Daily Quiz for February 28, 2017 appeared first on HistoryNet.

Video Review: Gunslingers, American Experience

Gunslingers, by American Heroes Channel, and American Experience: America’s Wild West  by PBS Home Video, $39.99. Last summer American Heroes Channel (previously the Military Channel) unveiled the six-part original series Gunslingers. Each episode is an action-packed hour-long docudrama that forgoes such typical documentary techniques as an omniscient narrator and historical stills to instead paint history …

The post Video Review: Gunslingers, American Experience appeared first on HistoryNet.

Sharps Called Its Model 1874 ‘Old Reliable,’ And the Popular Rifle Lived Up to Its Name

Legend has it no two were ever manufactured exactly alike. Colt, Winchester, Smith & Wesson and Remington are the “Big Four” iconic gun makers of the Wild West, but Sharps isn’t far behind. Flayderman’s Guide to Antique American Firearms and Their Values expertly summarizes this fifth giant: Among the illustrious names in American firearms history …

The post Sharps Called Its Model 1874 ‘Old Reliable,’ And the Popular Rifle Lived Up to Its Name appeared first on HistoryNet.

Lone Pine Film History Museum Makes the Reel West Feel Real

The late Jim Rogers made this paean to Westerns possible. It was in 1920, 17 years after the groundbreaking film The Great Train Robbery hit the big screen, that Hollywood discovered a perfect shooting location for Westerns and other films—the jumbled rocks of the Alabama Hills (backdropped by the snowcapped Sierra Nevada) near Lone Pine …

The post Lone Pine Film History Museum Makes the Reel West Feel Real appeared first on HistoryNet.

Brandon (& Smuggler City), Montana

A couple of miles east of the village of Sheridan, Montana, in the foothills of the Tobacco Root range, the pavement ends at the site of a once bustling mining district named Brandon. Lacking a post office, it was never officially a town. After the 1863 gold rush in Alder Gulch, a dozen miles to …

The post Brandon (& Smuggler City), Montana appeared first on HistoryNet.

With Cornmeal and Creativity: Food on the Great Plains

Farmers on the Great Plains depended on fickle nature for their diet, and many a cook relied on cornmeal. In 1857 Nebraska Territory school- teacher Mollie Dorsey Sanford re- corded that her breakfast was corn- bread and salt pork; lunch was cold cornbread, wild greens and boiled pork; and supper was hoecakes (cornbread), cold greens …

The post With Cornmeal and Creativity: Food on the Great Plains appeared first on HistoryNet.

The Singer, the Banjoist, and the Bullets

Singer Fannie Garrettson was certainly upstaged in Deadwood the night a former lover hurled an ax and tried to climb onstage before her new husband shot him dead. Despite—or perhaps because of—her subsequent notoriety, Fannie Garrettson’s background is obscure. For one her name appears variously in period newspapers as Fannie or Fanny, and Garrettson or …

The post The Singer, the Banjoist, and the Bullets appeared first on HistoryNet.

Montana Territory Massacre: Blood on the Snow

Soldiers got the right tribe but the wrong band in 1870 when they attacked a Blackfeet camp on the Marias River in an atrocity largely forgotten today. In the bitterly cold dawn of January 23, 1870, a Piegan Blackfeet youth named Bear Head rose early and set out in search of his horses in the …

The post Montana Territory Massacre: Blood on the Snow appeared first on HistoryNet.

Legend of the Apache Kid

When the trusted U.S. Army scout killed his father’s killer, that act of revenge set him on a course as a renegade whom no one could catch on either side of the Mexican border. Helge Ingstad crossed into Sonora, Mexico, on November 4, 1937, in search of the long- rumored “lost tribe” of Apaches of …

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