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Crown Point, TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO Weather :: 28C Mostly clear

mostly clearMostly clear 28°C

Humidity:
74%
Wind Speed:
13 KMH
Wind Direction:
E (090°)
Barometer:
1014 mb
Dewpoint:
23°C
Heat Index:
31°C
Wind Chill:
28°C
Visibility:
11 km
Crown Point, TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO Weather :: 24C Mostly clear

mostly clearMostly clear 24°C

Humidity:
88%
Wind Speed:
Calm
Barometer:
1012 mb
Dewpoint:
22°C
Heat Index:
24°C
Wind Chill:
24°C
Visibility:
11 km
Kudos for a job well done
Published: 
Saturday, December 20, 2014

In this busy season I write to congratulate the Town and Country Division on a their professionalism but more so on their efficiency. It’s something the public does not expect to meet when seeking the assistance and services of a governmental organisation. It appears that there is a transformation and I feel when good work is done, it should be recognised and highlighted.

On November 12 I applied to Town and Country for approval to do a renovation of an existing building. I had got all the forms and details of all that was required in early November and on November 12, submitted all that was requested in person.

My file was initially received by Ms Crystal Sam, and then checked by Bruce Charles and Asha Shepherd. After a thorough check, as they said they would not accept the application unless all items were submitted, they said “all was well” and said the entire process should be complete within two months. I thought this to be fair but wondered if it would happen having heard “stories from hell” from many a person.

Knowing things could wane, on December 10, I paid a courtesy call on the Ministry and they advised me of a small amendment I needed to make. I did this on the spot and returned the documents. Thereafter a Ms Vanessa John said she had my file and would be addressing it shortly. Follow-up is always a good thing and can never hurt a situation, so on this day I was glad I did do that.

On Thursday, one week later, to my incredible surprise I was provided with my “Permission to Develop” letter by another helpful staff member, Kerry Pariag. The entire process took five weeks—three weeks less than anticipated. The system works. And it works without pulling any hair or strings and most importantly, without difficulty. All we have to do is, it seems, submit what is requested and submit it accurately.

I like the change! Congratulations!

Sherrard

Ariapita turning into ‘Pothole Avenue’
Published: 
Saturday, December 20, 2014

Now, while I am aware that there are many potholes all over the country, I can only attest to those where I live, in particular Ariapita Avenue, which as everyone knows has become a “gaza strip” for the big spenders, not to mention a main artery in the West. Over the past two years potholes have been developing almost weekly and remain unattended to. 

Now, while I will not ask for a complete resurfacing of the Avenue (God knows we can ill-afford another multi-million dollar project with the price of oil being what it is) I am suggesting that a small team of workers be assigned to the avenue—for one day only (preferably a Sunday for obvious reasons)—to deal with the holes one by one. I am talking about less than one mile of vital roadway, from De Verteuil street (where there is a big one) to French street. 

While it may only be temporary, it will be better than how it is at present and could avoid motorists swerving to avoid them, causing accidents. I think it is overdue. After all, is this not what governments do in an election year?

W Dopson,
Woodbrook

Expedite the legal process
Published: 
Saturday, December 20, 2014

While I agree wholeheartedly with letter-writer Rudy Chato Paul SR’s assessment that the real issue is the lack of crime detection, but hand in hand with this is the early detection of crime accompanied by prompt and timely prosecution, expeditious, fair and legal sentencing and timely execution of sentence. We, perhaps, have placed too much emphasis on declaring total war on crime as a solution to the problem. 

Total war is a horrible solution—violence only breeds more violence. We as a country must live the adage “those who do the crime will pay the fine and/or do the time.” It must be firmly re-established and applied effectively and very necessarily, promptly.

If perpetrators believe that they can get away from this, or that it would take an exceptionally long time before they would be brought to account and stand the consequences, then they would easily be convinced that it is worth it and/or that they would at least have enough time to enjoy the benefits of ill-gotten gains. They then would easily be persuaded to do the crime.

Give some more attention to this and we would be more than halfway there.

DM Comissiong,
Petit Valley

Missing: drainage works along Manzanilla Road
Published: 
Saturday, December 20, 2014

The level of “brilliance” within the PP’s various ministries are revealed almost on a daily basis and never ceases to amaze me! But today, the vie-ki-vie, mamaguy, giving-meh-partna-ah-bread repair works being done on the Manzanilla Road takes the cake! Exactly what caused the destruction of the road in the first place? Not the lack of drainage, period? So where is the drainage? Is Minister Rambachan paying attention to what is being done? I doh think so nuh!

The Ministry of Works and Infrastructure boldly posts pictures and brags about the speedy work being done to repair the road, but absolutely no evidence of drainage can be seen! I am by no means an engineer, but common sense tells me that if no drainage is being built, history will inevitably only repeat itself! After all, the road does run alongside Trinidad’s biggest wetlands, Nariva Swamp. 

Or is that the plan? For disaster to strike again so that another partna could eat ah food?
 
PM Smith,
via e-mail

Should a CoP be more brawn than brain?
Published: 
Saturday, December 20, 2014

Should a Commissioner of Police be chosen purely on his ability to physically capture a felon, shoot straight and be willing to work 24/7 in all weathers, trail through marijuana bushes, crawl under dilapidated and infested houses and still come up smiling? Should he be more brawn than brain?

With the worrying state of our crime statistics we need to quickly decide on the ideal qualifications. What cannot be ignored is the fact that willingness to serve must match aptitude with new technology and the ability to communicate intelligently. 

Say what you will, five passes at basic level subjects will not suffice. A CoP must be able to function at various operational levels. Proficiency with a gun and success with numerous arrests can never be enough in a modern day police service. Education to BA level should be mandatory and a qualification in basic law would be an asset. Candidates should have completed a minimum of ten years’ service and have proven ability in interacting well with other officers and members of the public.  

Thirty years in the trenches of the police service is no longer an ideal qualification in a modern society. Each candidate should be Internet savvy and should face rigorous psychological/psychiatric testing to be proven as able to cope with levels of stress. It is obvious that a Commissioner of Police must ideally be chosen from the senior ranks. Should we insist that officers must pre-qualify and have attained minimum senior inspector/assistant superintendent status? 

And importantly, the officer chosen must be capable of and be seen to function  within the framework of and all manifestations of the word “independent.”

Lynette Joseph
via e-mail

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