Login
Password
Sources on this Page

> Headlines by Category

 Home / Regional / Latin America / Trinidad & Tobago

You are using the plain HTML view, switch to advanced view for a more complete experience.

Forecast for Evening
Becoming fair with winds from the east at 6 mph.
Forecast for Afternoon
Fair with winds from the east at 17 mph.
Forecast for Morning
Fair with winds from the east at 6 mph.
Forecast for Overnight
Fair with winds from the east at 6 mph.
Crown Point, TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO Weather :: 29C Mostly cloudy

mostly cloudyMostly cloudy 29°C

Humidity:
62%
Wind Speed:
34 KMH
Wind Direction:
E (090°)
Barometer:
1015 mb
Dewpoint:
21°C
Heat Index:
31°C
Wind Chill:
29°C
Visibility:
11 km
Crown Point, TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO Weather :: 25C Mostly clear

mostly clearMostly clear 25°C

Humidity:
78%
Wind Speed:
10 KMH
Wind Direction:
E (080°)
Barometer:
1016 mb
Dewpoint:
21°C
Heat Index:
26°C
Wind Chill:
25°C
Visibility:
11 km
Baptiste new head at Republic
Published: 
Friday, February 12, 2016

Nigel Baptiste yesterday took up his appointment as Republic Bank’s managing director and president of Republic Financial Holdings Ltd (RFHL).

Baptiste has been with Republic for 25 years and has served as an executive director for the past ten years.

In a statement yesterday Republic said that Baptiste leads the group with the support of the team of executive directors, which now comprises Derwin Howell, Roopnarine Oumade Singh and Jacqueline Quamina. Robert Le Hunte, who runs the bank’s operations in Ghana and Ian De Souza, who runs the Barbados subsidiary are also executive directors.

“It is a privilege to have been given this opportunity to lead what I believe is an excellent and dedicated team of individuals,” said Baptiste. 

Baptiste replaces David Dulal-Whiteway, who retired on Ash Wednesday, after ten years at the helm of the bank. 

Chairman of RFHL, Ronald Harford, said: “We are delighted to welcome Mr. Baptiste into his new role and look forward to continued success under his leadership. We also thank Mr. Dulal-Whiteway for his years of service, during which time he has played a significant role in the development of the Group."

Republic generated $1.2 billion in profit after tax for its 2015 financial year, which ended on September 30. The 2015 performance was 0.6 per cent better than the bank’s after-tax profit in 2014.

Former Managing Director of Republic Bank and President of RFHL, David Dulal-Whiteway (left) presents the bank’s new Managing Director and President of RFHL, Nigel Baptiste, with a plaque, symbolizing the changing of the guard. Dulal-Whiteway retired from the bank on Wednesday.
Mr Tim Kee’s terrible tone-deafness
Published: 
Friday, February 12, 2016

The remarks, effectively victim-blaming, would be controversial at any time. The surprisingly oft-expressed notion that a woman who is sexually assaulted and attacked brought it on herself because of how she dressed is offensive, and not just to women. That the comments were offered in reaction to the death of woman on the Savannah stumbled several league beyond tone-deafness, to the point of outrageousness. 

Tributes to the late Japanese pannist Asami Nagakiya have been fulsome and warm, mourning the loss of a well-liked young woman. Some concerns were expressed about what her murder does to Trinidad and Tobago’s international reputation, coming as it did on the day of the country’s cultural high point and main cultural export, its carnival. 

However the overwhelming sense was of the loss of a beautiful soul, who had made many friends and embraced T&T distinctive musical art form as if it were her own. That she was Japanese seemed not to have been noticed that much. Friends and fellow pannists remembered her for who she was, rather than where she’d come from.

The exception to the well-pitched round of tributes and commiserations was Port-of-Spain mayor, Raymond Tim Kee, whose comments in reaction to her death were insensitive and crass. Invited to react to the discovery of the still-to-be-identified body early Wednesday, Tim Kee referred to earlier remarks, in which he’d warned against what he regarded as public lewdness by women scantily clad in carnival costumes.

  “I spoke of what I see women do, assisted by men of course, but the woman has responsibility that they ensure that they are not abused”, he ventured.

So far, so out of context. Remember that he was commenting on the discovery of the body of a reveller still clad in her mas costume. He went on: “You have to let your imagination roll a bit and figure out if there was any evidence of resistance, or alcohol control and therefore involuntary actions were engaged in and so on.” 

The remarks, effectively victim-blaming, would be controversial at any time. The surprisingly oft-expressed notion that a woman who is sexually assaulted and attacked brought it on herself because of how she dressed is offensive, and not just to women. That the comments were offered in reaction to the death of woman on the Savannah stumbled several league beyond tone-deafness, to the point of outrageousness. 

Social media has been unforgiving, scornful and incredulous. Many wanted to know how a man such in a critical leadership position not see that victim-blaming, albeit ill-judged rather than malicious, was precisely the wrong sentiment to express at this time? It was read by many—on social media by women in particular but not exclusively—as Mr Tim Kee implying that Ms Nagakiya had been responsible for the violence that was perpetrated against her.

Not just at Carnival time but at all through the year, many women are harassed, assaulted and abused and these attacks have nothing to do with what their behaviour, or their clothing. There is no plausible defence for glossing over attacks of this nature, and, albeit unintentionally, offering as an excuse what the woman wore, or being judgmental about it. Somewhere in his awfully expressed reaction is a message to woman (and men) to take care with their personal safety at carnival time. Nevertheless, public outrage is justified, and calls for his removal are understandable.

Mr Tim Kee’s apology seemed to make things worse. He ended up doubling down on his earlier remarks, stating that some people agreed with what he had to say. He said his remarks had been taken out of context. He should apologise, again, clearly, without reservation or equivocation.

 

From Hummingbird to Dying Swan
Published: 
Friday, February 12, 2016

In 1990, Judy Raymond, considering Minshall’s King of Carnival, Saga Boy (I think it was), wrote: I knew it was art because it made the hair on my body stand on end. A generation later, mas man Peter Minshall, declining to politely fade into the background, allowing the lesser lights their lime, set the 2016 Carnival ablaze with his king, The Dying Swan: Ras Najinsky in Drag as Pavlova.

Quite in St Philip, Barbados, watching footage shot on a cellphone video camera, every hair on my body stood to attention and shivered in salute. And I wished I could have been in the Savannah, to see it with my own eyes—and to hear the collective gasp; not since 1980’s Midnight Robber has a mas blown me to firetruck away like this.

The Dying Swan is: 1. a moko jumbie, a “traditional” costume but; 2. Minshall reengineers it with a stroke of presque vu genius akin to the flip-top of a toothpaste tube—how come no one ever thought of a moko jumbie on firetrucking tiptoe before? and then Minshall 3. uses the old as a springboard to (swan?) dive into something totally new that; 4. joins the Old World and the New seamlessly while; 5. simultaneously cleanly separating them and bringing; 6. theatre and; 7. history back into the mas to 8. remind us that we once had the 9. depth; 10. gumption and 11. self-esteem to 12. view the whole world as our stage and our palette.

Not bad, for a man on stilts.

But the Mas Man himself is standing on the shoulders of giants.

Just as, 40 years ago, he took the old bat mas and made it startlingly new several times—the Serpent, Mancrab, the Sacred and the Profane—Minshall used the old moko jumbie to hold up the mirror anew, revealing ourselves to ourselves.

Or trying to.

If we were what we could be, that mas would have come first for the next three years; because of what we are now—and perhaps what we may have permanently become—the man pulling the pretty float that “won” used his apparent (but actually Pyrrhic) victory to whine on Minshall about a moko jumbie placing so high; he had probably rehearsed his speech with Ras Najinsky winning, so perhaps did not want to waste it; but it was one of those rants that said less about the thing spoken about and more about the person speaking.

And the people spoken to.

Ras Najinsky deserves to be the defining memory of Carnival 2016—but it will be hard to forget other powerful, less salubrious occurrences; such as a young man being stabbed to death allegedly by a Carnival band’s “security” (and Minshall’s heart must have broken to see the personification of his dying swan come about so swiftly); the Japanese pan player (probably) murdered and left in the Savannah for the Port-of-Spain mayor to insult; and that lonely, sad beauty in the G-string and pasties, reducing herself to her buttocks and pudenda.

In the 40-odd years Minshall has been making mas in Trinidad, Carnival, like everything else, has changed; and a lot of people on my side of 50 wouldn’t consider it to have developed; the so-called all-inclusive-but-really-all-exclusive model hasn’t managed to completely spoil Jouve yet but, for me, everything else remotely good left in Carnival has been ruined by the sheer din: if you played, “Sa-Sa-Yey” at today’s eardrum-shattering volume, it wouldn’t sound sweet, but like “galvanize” sheets being folded; after being ironed flat.

My pardner Raymond Ramcharitar takes probably the dimmest public view of modern Carnival, rendering it as a PNM propaganda tool à la Himmler, and denying any legitimate expression of public anger whatever to Canboulay—but his own open letter to Minshall published in this space on Wednesday should be read by everyone; even those—especially those—who disagree with him; in (my estimation of its) essence, it recognises the beauty of Ras Najinsky but declares it falls on barren soil: Minsh is talking to himself, but Ray will listen, if no one else, because they have all left the Savannah and are in da club or da cocktails party; or, indeed, da political party.

Between Raymond and Minsh there lies a great deal of good thinking about the possibilities and limits of Carnival—my former drinking and still writing pardner Si-Oh Lee, in this paper yesterday, should also be read, as should Mark Lyndersay, Raffique Shan, Sunity Maharaj and others.

But all our thinking amounts to nothing if it fails to turn into positive action; and there are people in positions of real power and influence—the King of Carnival, the mayor of Port-of-Spain—who bring to their utterances no thought at all.

How many such have Cabinet portfolios? And what can those of us, without, actually do?

The function of the artist is to show the society what it is; and there may never have been a clearer depiction of that than Ras Najinsky. The shivers that ran up our collective spine the first time we bore witness to it, though, are but one side of the coin: toss it, and the chill runs icily down that national spine and crumples at our feet in a yellow bikini, with pan sticks in hand. If the burgesses of Port-of-Spain allow a functionary so manifestly unsuitable to remain in office, the swan would have died in vain.

And Minshall, having given us the Hummingbird and the Dying Swan, will have to start his drawings of the Cobo.

 

BC Pires does take this shiretrit too seriously, oui; give that man a drink and a big work and keep his short a--- quart

Post Selected Items to:

Showing 10 items of about 1200

home  •   advertising  •   terms of service  •   privacy  •   about us  •   contact us  •   press release design by Popshop •   Official PR partner PRNews.io •   © 1999-2016 NewsKnowledge