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Global Wildlife Program
Why is the Global Wildlife Program needed? The illegal wildlife trade (IWT) is a global threat. The problem is particularly acute in Africa, where iconic species – the African elephant, white and black rhinos, and pangolins – are being poached to extinction. About 33,000 elephants are poached every year for their ivory. The rhino poaching crisis is also escalating. In 2007, 13 rhinos were poached in South Africa, in 2015, 1,338 rhinos were poached--1,175 of those in South Africa alone. As species are poached and illegally harvested at increasingly unsustainable levels, wildlife crime has become the fourth most lucrative illegal business after narcotics, human trafficking, and weapons. The presence of wildlife in protected areas ensures that an ecosystem can function and maintain natural capital (soil, forests, air, water, etc.) As natural resource crime such as poaching increases, it results in environmental degradation. This adversely affects ecosystem services, which in turn affects the survival of these communities who depend upon these services for livelihoods, fuel and food. The cost of environmental crime to developing countries is estimated to be more than $70 billion a year (World Bank 2014). To respond to the growing crisis and international call for action, the Global Environment Facility (GEF) in June 2015 launched the “Global Partnership on Wildlife Conservation and Crime Prevention for Sustainable Development” program also known as the Global Wildlife Program (GWP). What does the Global Wildlife Program aim to do? The GWP is a World-Bank led global partnership that promotes wildlife conservation and sustainable development by combatting illicit trafficking in wildlife. This seven-year, $131 million grant program is expected to leverage an additional $704 million in additional co-financing from a wide range of partners to promote investments across Africa and Asia. By approaching the poaching crisis holistically through various country projects and a larger global project, it seeks to reduce both the supply and demand that drives the illegal wildlife trade, and protect species and habitats through integrated landscape planning.   GWP’s priority and immediate focus is combating wildlife poaching, trafficking, and demand. The program also focuses on improving wildlife management, providing livelihood opportunities through tourism, and improving governance throughout the supply chain for illegal wildlife products. In addition, the program will support integrated landscape management, land use zoning and natural resource management best practices. Through its global and country projects, the GWP will:Promote community-based natural resource management and tourism development: Often in challenging political environments.Help countries achieve their biodiversity goals: It will support the implementation of country priorities identified in the National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan, Elephant Action Plan and other wildlife and tourism national strategies.Accelerate learning: It will develop an online repository of information and conduct training and capacity building workshops to ensure knowledge exchange between countries, partners and other stakeholders. It will provide opportunities for regional and global knowledge exchanges.Enhance collaboration: It will foster intergovernmental cooperation, leverage monitoring and evaluation and geospatial tools, increase intelligence sharing to track criminals, collaborate on efforts around anti-money laundering, capture lessons learned, apply best practices, and innovative communication strategies.  In addition, it will include a component to promote best practices in ports and collaboration between African and Asian countries and agencies involved in reducing maritime transport of illegal wildlife products, especially ivory.Strengthen partnerships: It will build synergies with the International Consortium on Combating Wildlife Crime (ICCWC). It is a collaboration between the CITES Secretariat, INTERPOL, UNODC, the World Customs Organization and the WBG, which has been a partner to ICCWC since 2010.Implement a monitoring and evaluation framework:  It will develop and deploy a monitoring system for the program to track program progress and serve as an integral tool to promote synergies amongst national projects.Coordinate programs with the GEF Secretariat and implementing agencies: To ensure coordination amongst projects within and beyond the program. This will be an important mechanism for implementation of GEF-6 (2014-2018) Biodiversity Strategy program three which is focused on preventing the extinction of known threatened species. The GWP also aims to target other focal areas of the GEF-6: Biodiversity, Land Degradation, Climate Change and Sustainable Forest Management.Promote donor coordination: As part of ongoing engagement with key international donors, the program will serve as a platform to assess the current state of international funding to tackle illicit trafficking in wildlife. The GWP released the first-ever review of international donor funding for combatting illegal wildlife trade in Africa and Asia, which shows that over $1.3 billion was committed by 24 international donors since 2010. The report serves as a baseline the donor community can build upon, which in consultation with recipient countries, can establish the future state vision for IWT financing. This will facilitate sharing of lessons learned and inform strategic efforts to fill financing gaps for priority intervention areas. Who are the GWP partner countries? Collectively, the GWP countries make up an incredible repository of biodiversity and potential for sustainable de¬velopment. The program’s integrated platform will sup¬port national governments and development partners to reduce the impacts of wildlife poaching and trafficking, and promote livelihood activities by local communities. In Africa, the GWP has programs in Botswana, Cameroon, Ethiopia, Gabon, Kenya, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, the Republic of Congo, South Africa, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. In Asia, programs are in Afghanistan, India, Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam. The implementing agencies channeling the funds to the governments or other partners for the national projects are the World Bank Group, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), United Nations Environment Programme (UN Environment), and the Asian Development Bank (ADB). The GWP also collaborates with the International Consortium to Combat Wildlife Crime (ICCWC) and other donors and conservation partners to implement an integrated approach for biodiversity conservation, wildlife crime prevention and sustainable development, including:Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS)The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) SecretariatWorld Wildlife Fund (WWF)International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN)TrafficWildAid 
Small States Forum 2017 - From Roadmap to Action
On October 14, 2017, the annual Small States Forum was held at the World Bank Group/IMF Annual Meetings. This high-level event brought together heads of government, ministers and central bank governors from small states, as well as World Bank Group management and partner organizations from OECD, Commonwealth Secretariat, UNDP and IMF to discuss the pressing challenges and opportunities that small states face.  Key issues included vulnerability, increased funding from the International Development Association (IDA), de-risking and partnerships.  The new Chair of the Small States Forum, the Right Honorable Prime Minister Keith Mitchell of Grenada, received a warm welcome by members. The new Caribbean leadership of the Small States Forum is very timely and coincides with the Prime Minister’s Chairmanship of CARICOM. This year’s event took place in the aftermath of devastating hurricanes in the Caribbean, which put a spotlight on small islands vulnerable to extreme weather events. In her opening remarks, Kristalina Georgieva, the Chief Executive Officer of the World Bank, provided highlights of a high-level roundtable on recovery and resilience in the Caribbean during the Annual Meetings. At this event, Kristalina noted that the World Bank, other international financial institutions, and representatives of CARICOM countries and territories reaffirmed their commitment to help rebuild the Caribbean and share expertise on how similar crises have been managed elsewhere. Manuela Ferro, Vice President of Operations Policy and Country Services, emphasized efforts the World Bank is making to provide more financing to small states, most notably the massive increase in IDA resources, the World Bank’s fund for the 75 poorest countries. The most recent replenishment of IDA's resources, the eighteenth (IDA18), resulted in a record replenishment of $75 billion over the next three years. This is a significant increase from previous replenishments, particularly for small states. Total funds allocated to small states for FY18-20 under IDA18 – $1.9 billion – more than doubled the previous allocation in the previous 3 years. This provides real opportunities for countries to overcome poverty and set a sustainable growth path. As noted by Manuela Ferro, “we now need to focus on concrete activities to make the best possible use of these resources.”  The discussion also highlighted the many ways the World Bank supports small states, which was covered in the first session. Joaquim Levy, Managing Director and Chief Financial Officer of the World Bank, outlined some practical solutions and actions to support small states that face de-risking – the phenomenon of financial institutions terminating or restricting business relationships with clients to avoid, rather than manage risk.  He singled out the role of technology as a possible solution to challenges small states face in the banking sector and the potential of ‘blockchain’ technology and other initiatives to help facilitate remittances and other financial flows to and from small states. The World Bank’s Vice President for Latin America and the Caribbean, Jorge Familiar, highlighted innovations in the World Bank’s toolkit of instruments, including the Catastrophic Risk Insurance and the Catastrophe-Deferred Drawdown Option, which offer financing to respond to emergencies and build resilience to external shocks. The second session of the Forum showcased various accomplishments and innovations led by small states over recent years.  Prime Minister Mitchell set the stage by praising the Small States Forum as a platform for development solutions. 
Nigerians praise anti-graft record as Buhari turns 75
President opt for quiet birthday celebration
Educação: Crianças deficientes estão a ficar para trás, afirma o relatório do Banco Mundial e da Parceria Global para a Educação
WASHINGTON, D.C., 1º de Dezembro de 2017 – Crianças deficientes estão a ficar para trás nas atividades para melhorar as oportunidades de educação para todos em vista de as lacunas entre crianças com e sem deficiências terem aumentado drasticamente nos países em desenvolvimento segundo a nova investigação realizada pelo Banco Mundial e pela Parceria Global para a Educação (GPE) divulgada antes do Dia Internacional das Pessoas com Deficiência. O estudo Disability Gaps in Educational Attainment and Literacy (Lacunas na Deficiência no Desempenho Educacional e na Alfabetização), observou que a conclusão do ensino primário no caso de crianças deficientes em 19 países em desenvolvimento* é apenas 48% e três em cada 10 crianças nunca frequentaram a escola. Este estudo, baseado numa análise de dados do censo, também concluiu que as taxas de alfabetização e a finalização do ensino secundário são consideravelmente inferiores: somente seis de cada 10 crianças deficientes podem ler e escrever e somente um terço termina o ensino secundário. “Assegurar que todas as crianças tenham a mesma oportunidade de frequentar a escola e de aprender deve ser uma das principais prioridades para pôr fim à crise persistente da aprendizagem. Mais do que o género ou o status socioeconómico, a deficiência tem um impacto desproporcional sobre as oportunidades da criança de aprender”, afirmou Quentin Wodon, Economista Principal do Banco Mundial e coautor do estudo. “Ao trabalharmos com os países no sentido de investir cada vez mais em sua população, é crítico que as crianças deficientes não fiquem para trás”. As lacunas entre as crianças com e sem deficiência aumentaram substancialmente nos últimos 30-40 anos. Em grande parte as crianças deficientes têm sido excluídas das iniciativas para melhorar os resultados da educação no mundo em desenvolvimento. Por exemplo, apesar do alto índice de matrícula escolar em muitos dos países abrangidos pelo relatório, a lacuna na conclusão do ensino primário entre crianças deficientes e não deficientes permanece 15 pontos percentuais para as raparigas e 18 pontos percentuais para os rapazes. O relatório demonstra que essas lacunas são o resultado da exclusão associada a deficiências, em oposição a outras características das crianças decorrentes de deficiências. O relatório também constatou que crianças com deficiência mental ou com múltiplas deficiências tendem a ter atuação pior do que crianças com deficiências físicas ou deficiências relacionadas com a audição, visão ou fala. Segundo os peritos no assunto, o acesso à escola para crianças deficientes é frequentemente limitado pela falta de compreensão das suas necessidades, escassez de peritos e falta de instalações adequadas, apoio em salas de aula e recursos de aprendizagem. “O facto de as crianças deficientes compreenderem o seu direito à educação terá um impacto positivo e perdurável sobre a sua aprendizagem, realização e oportunidades de emprego, a contribuir assim tanto para o próprio desenvolvimento como para o desenvolvimento económico, social e humano das comunidades e países”, afirmou Louise Banham, Assessora Sénior em Educação da GPE. “A GPE está a trabalhar em estreita colaboração com os seus parceiros no apoio à inclusão de crianças deficientes nos sistemas educacionais”. Os Objetivos do Desenvolvimento Sustentável (ODS) incluem uma educação de qualidade inclusiva e equitativa com o objetivo de assegurar acesso igual a todos os níveis da educação para os vulneráveis, incluindo crianças deficientes. Os ODS propõem a construção e melhoria das instalações educacionais sensíveis às crianças, deficiências e género, bem como proporciona ambientes seguros, inclusives e eficazes. Como parte dos seus esforços no sentido de promover uma educação inclusive e assegurar que todas as crianças tenham a oportunidade de terem êxito na vida, o Banco Mundial está a trabalhar no conceito e implementação de estratégias educacionais inclusivas, projetos de financiamento e oferecimento de apoio consultivo a países como China, Índia, Malaui, Moldávia, Tunísia e Vietname. A Parceria Global para a Educação também proporciona aos países em desenvolvimento financiamento e orientação para desenvolver e implementar planos educacionais robustos que incluam estratégias para cobrir a lacuna entre acesso, participação e aprendizagem no intuito de assegurar que as crianças deficientes possam frequentar a escola e aprender. * Os 19 países incluídos no relatório são: Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Camboja, Costa Rica, República Dominicana, Etiópia, Gana, Indonésia, Quénia, Libéria, Mali, Malaui, México, Moçambique, Peru, África do Sul, Sudão do Sul, Vietname e Zâmbia.   Para obter informações mais detalhadas, favor consultar: Banco Mundial Parceria Global para a Educação    
Ghana: Catalyzing South–South Dialogue for Managing Contingent Liabilities
ACCRA, December 12, 2017-The spreadsheet projected at the far end of the wall showed a scorecard the team had developed over a period of a few days. The discussion was lively, nobody held back, everybody chipped in as they talked through what financial ratios and ratings to use. It was a team of highly devoted experts: middle office professionals from the Ghanaian Debt Management Office (DMO) and energy sector specialists. The task they had been charged with was not easy: developing a method for assessing and managing the risks of contingent liabilities stemming from government guarantees and on-lending practices. They would evaluate the scoring of the most prominent Ghanaian state-owned enterprise, the Volta River Authority (VRA), so they could assign a risk/cost profile to this public entity. The team was steered by a seasoned practitioner, Mkhulu Maseko, the head of the credit risk team at the South African National Treasury, which was supporting the Ghanaian DMO in its efforts to develop the scorecard. The advice he gave was pragmatic and in-depth; he shared information on how South Africa assigned financial ratios or ratings, despite a limited availability of data. He demonstrated how to move, step by step, through a maze of institutional constraints—some derived from the relationship between companies, and others from limitations regarding background, quantitative training, or the number of staff. Tailoring technical assistance to the country context As part of an ambitious reform agenda supported by the International Monetary Fund, the Ghanaian Ministry of Finance had been looking for ways to better anticipate and manage fiscal risks in the broader public sector. Assessing and monitoring risks related to contingent liabilities was one of the areas to look at. Earlier this year, a small workshop was organized by the Government Debt and Risk Management (GDRM) Program, a World Bank Treasury initiative targeting middle income countries which is funded by the Swiss State Secretariat for Economic Affairs. The program provides tailored technical assistance for member country’s debt management needs. For Ghana, the GDRM team decided to leverage the expertise of the South African National Treasury because it had recently developed a methodology for managing contingent liabilities risks. Ghana needed technical advice on a pragmatic level, not conceptual lessons, as it was looking for ways to improve fiscal sustainability. Maseko would be a sound consultant for Ghana, and South Africa’s National Treasury was supportive of him providing the advice. Presenting options and selecting the right methodology With the involvement of the South African consultant, the GDRM program team laid out alternative options, illustrating comparable country examples and methodologies. The Ghanaian DMO officials decided on using the credit scoring methodology. “Akin to scorecards used by international credit rating agencies, like Moody’s or Standard & Poor’s, the basic premise is to assess each entity on several factors, such as management quality, financial performance, business environment, and capital expenditure plan, and produce a single aggregated score,” said Sebastien Boitreaud, Financial Officer for the GDRM Program. “This score determines the credit risk of a given entity not paying back the borrowed amount in full and on time.” The score card methodology is currently in use by Indonesia as well as South Africa to assess the contingent liability risk for their state-owned enterprises.  The team held two more workshops in Accra to develop an initial scorecard, and another later for improving the risk quantification of the initial scorecard for the Volta River Authority. It advised on public financial management law, and on moving from a theoretical credit score to a practical guarantee fee. “We were preparing for our new law that would codify most of our risk management activities,” said Samuel Arkhurst, Director of the Debt Management Division, Ministry of Finance, Ghana. “But before the law was passed we already had a very good idea of how we were going to implement elements of it.” Putting guidelines in place Ghana has put guidelines in place to steer decision making around guarantees and on-lending; these are part of a reform plan to consolidate public finances. When implemented, the guidelines will be one of the contributions toward improving fiscal sustainability and making the country’s economy more resilient to financial shocks.
Renforcer la lutte contre le braconnage dans les parcs naturels du Gabon
LIBREVILLE, le 23 mai 2017—Marcher à quelques mètres d’un troupeau d’éléphants, voir des hippopotames barboter pour se rafraîchir dans les mangroves ou encore observer de jeunes tarpons sautiller dans l’eau, est incontestablement un spectacle magnifique et inoubliable. On peut encore admirer ce spectacle à Setté Cama, dans la province de l’Ogooué-Maritime, dans le sud-Ouest du Gabon. Mais pour combien de temps encore ? Les sites de Setté Cama et de Petit Loango sont des zones humides protégées par la Convention de Ramsar. Ils regroupent essentiellement cinq milieux distincts : des marécages et prairies, des forêts inondées en permanence, des forêts à terre ferme, des plaines côtières et deux grandes lagunes regorgeant de nombreuses mangroves et rivières. D’une superficie totale de 370 000 ha, les sites abritent une flore et une faune exceptionnelles et indispensables, qu’il faut bien connaître et comprendre afin de mieux les protéger. C’est dans cette optique que la Banque mondiale a décidé de financer le Projet d’Appui à la gestion durable des Zones Humides critiques du Gabon (PAZH), qui est mis en œuvre depuis juillet 2014. Son objectif ? Améliorer la protection de la biodiversité dans les zones humides forestières, et contribuer à mettre en place des mesures de conservation qui permettent de gérer durablement ces écosystèmes. Anicet Megne, travaille également sur le projet PAZH. Du haut de son mètre 83, ce conservateur de 52 ans, veille sans relâche sur la biodiversité et les écosystèmes du parc national, avec ses équipes d’éco gardes. « Notre rôle est de sécuriser et protéger l’habitat, Loango est un parc phare, on y trouve des éléphants, des gorilles, des buffles, ou encore des singes, pour ne parler que des mammifères. Mais les infractions que nous constatons concernent tous types d’animaux, il s’agit principalement de la pêche illégale et du braconnage », nous explique-t-il. « L’appui financier et matériel que nous apporte le projet PAZH nous permet de couvrir une plus grande superficie des sites classés RAMSAR et de mieux protéger la faune et la flore qui s’y trouvent. » conclut-il.
アフリカ地域
概要 2015年のサブサハラ・アフリカの成長率は、主に石油をはじめとする商品価格の下落を反映し、2014年の4.5%を下回る4.1%となる見込みです。 金属その他の主要一次産品の輸出国では、一次産品価格の下落に伴い活動が鈍化する一方、ほとんどの低所得国では、インフラ投資と農業拡大により堅調な成長が続くと予想されています。非石油部門、特にサービス部門では成長が続き、2016年以降の成長率を押し上げると見られます。低位中所得国と高位中所得国では、公共投資の増大と観光業の回復により成長が促進されるでしょう。 詳細は2015年度年次報告書(PDF)をご覧ください。  活動 世界銀行グループは、アフリカ地域の経済成長と貧困削減、経済的多様化、また新たな包括的開発フレームワークに重点をおいて取り組みを行っています。 また、以下の分野に優先的に取り組んでいます。農業生産性の向上小農家に対する技術面や資金面での支援、アグリビジネスへの投資、水源管理、また気候変動に優しい農業を推進しています。エネルギーの確保安価で安定的かつ持続可能なエネルギーの供給の他、気候変動適応と防災が最重要課題です。地域統合地域間の連携を強め、経済の活性化と生産性の強化を図ります。都市化水、衛生、交通、住居、権力とガバナンスの管理が、都市化による生産性と収入向上の鍵となります。質の高い人的資本としての若年層の育成雇用のニーズと人材のギャップを埋めるべく、若年層の技術スキル向上支援を行っています。 詳細はアフリカ地域ページ(英語)をご覧ください。
Social Inclusion in Africa
Although great strides have been made towards poverty reduction in Africa, the region hosts half of the world’s extreme poor. Latest estimates suggest that the share of the African population in extreme poverty declined from 57 percent in 1990 to 41 percent in 2013 (Beegle et al. 2016, World Bank 2016a). Yet, the world’s extreme poor will be increasingly concentrated in Africa: 389 million people in Africa were still living on less than US$1.90 a day in 2013, more than in all other regions combined (World Bank 2016a). Poverty reduction in Africa also lags other regions: East Asia and South Asia started out with similar poverty rates in the 1990s, but their poverty rates are much lower today at 4 percent and 15 percent respectively (Beegle et al. 2016, World Bank 2016a). Lastly, the region not only houses the largest number of the poor, but Africa’s poor are, on average, living much further below the US$1.90-a-day extreme poverty threshold (World Bank 2016a). Ending global poverty therefore requires urgent action in Africa and a social inclusion lens will be indispensable towards this: It takes poverty analysis beyond identifying correlates to uncovering its underlying causes, asking questions such as why certain groups are overrepresented among the poor and why some people lack access to education, health or other services. Social inclusion is the process of improving the terms for individuals and groups to take part in society (World Bank 2013a). Individuals take part in society through three interrelated domains: markets (e.g. labor, land, housing, credit), services (e.g. electricity, health, education, water) and spaces (e.g. political, cultural, physical, social). To improve the terms on which people take part in society means to enhance their ability, opportunity and dignity. Identity is the key driver of social exclusion: Individuals and groups are excluded or included based on their identity. Among the most common group identities resulting in exclusion are gender, race, caste, ethnicity, religion, age, occupational status, location, and disability status. Social exclusion based on such group attributes can lead to lower social standing, often accompanied by lower outcomes in terms of income, human capital endowments, access to employment and services, and voice in both national and local decision making. In Africa, while social exclusion has many faces, some stand out: The number of youth in Africa is growing rapidly, presenting both opportunities and risks. 50 percent of the population in the region are under 25 years of age (World Bank 2014). By 2050, Africa will have 362 million people aged between 15 and 24 (World Bank 2014). This rapid increase contrasts starkly with the Middle East and North Africa, where increases in the size of this cohort have steadied, and even with East Asia, where numbers are dominated by China and the size of this cohort is expected to fall from 350 million in 2010 to 225 million by 2050 (World Bank 2014). With the right policies and programs in place, a young population offers tremendous opportunities for a “demographic dividend”. Yet, over the next 10 years, only one in four of Africa’s youth are expected to find a wage job at best (World Bank 2014). This lack of opportunities not only threatens the realization of the demographic dividend. At its worst, it can contribute to radicalization and violence. A study in Kenya, for instance, suggested that 57 percent of al-Shabaab respondents joined the group when they were below 24 years (Botha 2014). The opportunities for women in Africa are constrained, not least, due to violence and insecurity. 46 percent of women in Africa have experienced either non-partner sexual violence or physical or sexual violence by an intimate partner, or both (World Health Organization 2013). In the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), for instance, approximately 1.7 to 1.8 million women reported having been raped in their lifetime (Peterman et al. 2011). Access to maternal health services is still a challenge, so that childbirth remains a potential threat to the life of women: Over 200,000 women in Africa still die each year giving birth (World Bank 2015a). Women’s lack of voice in decisions that concern their lives is at the center of many of these issues. In Malawi and DRC, for example, 34 percent and 28 percent of married women respectively are not involved in decisions about spending their earnings (World Bank 2011). At the same time, 26 percent of households in Africa are headed by women, forming a particularly vulnerable sub-group (Beegle et al. 2016). Yet, Africa also has a high rate of female entrepreneurship at 33 percent (World Bank 2016b), speaking to the potential and resilience of women in the region, which can contribute to an acceleration in the development of the continent. Forced displacement is another inclusion challenge in Africa. A symptom of conflict, persecution, human rights abuses, natural disasters and failure of governance, the region hosted 5.1 million refugees at the end of 2016, 30 percent of global refugees (UNHCR 2017). While refugees are faced with aid dependency and a life in encampment situations, the communities hosting them often belong to the poorest and most excluded in their respective country, living in secluded and underdeveloped borderlands. Turkana County in Kenya, for instance, which is home to the Kakuma refugee camp, has a poverty rate of 88 percent compared to the national average of 45 percent (Kenya Bureau of Statistics 2014). Protracted refugee presence adds to the challenges for these host communities. Severe environmental degradation, for example, has tremendous impacts on their livelihoods. However, refugee presence also comes with positives for host communities: The Gross Regional Product (GRP) of Turkana increases permanently by 3.4 percent as a result of refugee presence and total employment increases by 2.9 percent. Consumption measures within 5 km of the camp are up to 35 percent higher than in other parts of the county (Sanghi et al. 2016). With the right measures in place, inclusive development of refugees and hosts can be fostered. Protracted conflict in the region has also created another group at risk of exclusion: ex-combatants. 20 countries in the region are categorized as fragile or conflict affected[1]. The Horn of Africa and the Great Lakes Region have been in conflict for over 20 years. In 2015, the World Bank estimated that there were 194,000 combatants in armed groups in Africa[2]. A 2016 study commissioned by the World Bank-administered Transitional Demobilization and Reintegration Program (TDRP) on armed movements in Mali found that youth comprised the majority of the ex-combatants, with the 18-40 age group representing 79 percent of them. The majority of the ex-combatants interviewed were married (76.7 percent), and 67.4 percent of them supported 6-10 dependents, pointing to the strong need for supporting and reintegrating them (World Bank 2017a). Almost 1 in 10 working-age adults in Africa has a disability (Mitra et al. 2013) [3]. Persons with disabilities oftentimes have lower primary school completion and lower employment rates than persons without disabilities. Among seven African countries for which comparable data from the World Health Survey (WHS) is available, Mauritius has the largest disparity (23 percent) in terms of average years of schooling while Malawi has the largest disparity (33 percent) in terms of primary school completion rate (Mitra et al. 2011). Lower access to services is often caused by stigma and discrimination, which in the extreme can threaten the life of persons with disabilities. Persons with albinism, for instance, are faced with dangerous myths in several parts of Africa: It is believed that they are ghost – not human beings – and that their body parts can bring wealth and good luck (Under the Same Sun 2014). In Tanzania, these cultural attitudes have resulted in 72 documented deaths of persons with albinism between 2007 and 2013 (Under the Same Sun 2014). Current trends in Africa contribute to these challenges of exclusion. Due to population momentum, for example, the number of people living in extreme poverty in Africa increased by more than 100 million although their population share declined (Beegle et al. 2016). In addition, inequality poses a challenge: Seven out of 10 most unequal countries are in Africa (Beegle et al. 2016). The region is also undergoing rapid urbanization with 40,000 new urban dwellers per day: Over 450 million new urban dwellers are expected between 2010 and 2040, with half of Africa’s population living in urban areas by that year (World Bank 2013b). While urbanization offers opportunities and demand for social mobility and changes norms and values, it also creates polarization: About 70 percent of Africa’s urban population lives in informal settlements (World Bank 2013b). Lastly, climate change is affecting the poorest: It is estimated that by 2030, up to 118 million extremely poor people will be exposed to drought, floods, and extreme heat in Africa (Shepherd et al. 2013). Yet, there are opportunities to be built upon towards inclusive development in Africa. At 4.5 percent per year over the past two decades, average economic growth in the region was remarkably robust (Beegle et al. 2016). Technology opens new avenues to reach out to the most vulnerable: the number of fixed and mobile phone lines per 1,000 people increased from three in 1990 to 736 in 2014, and the number of internet users per 100 people increased from 1.3 in 2005 to 16.7 in 2015 (World Bank 2017b). Innovation and entrepreneurial spirit can further contribute to lifting people out of poverty and exclusion: African tech startups raised funding in excess of US$129 million in 2016, with the number of startups securing funding up by 16.8 per cent compared to the previous year, according to data compiled by Disrupt Africa (Disrupt Africa 2017). Together with its partners, the World Bank is building on these opportunities towards a more inclusive Africa, using multiple entry points through analytics, operations and policy. Informed by analytical work on forced displacement in the Horn of Africa, for example, a regional project covering Ethiopia, Uganda, Djibouti and Kenya is responding to the needs of host communities regarding services, livelihoods and environmental sustainability. In support of women’s opportunities, a new project in Nigeria will focus on women’s economic empowerment, while interventions in the Great Lakes region and Uganda are focusing on the prevention and response to gender-based violence (GBV). The Africa Gender Innovation Lab is conducting impact evaluations looking at gender dynamics and gendered impacts of a broad range of projects to inform future interventions. With support from the Transitional Demobilization and Reintegration Program (TDRP), operations in DRC, the Central African Republic, Rwanda and Mali have supported the demobilization and reintegration of ex-combatants, providing them with training and livelihoods opportunities. In a demobilization project in Burundi, special emphasis was placed on addressing ex-combatants with disabilities, to name just one example for disability-inclusive development. In Mali, a skills development and youth employment project is helping youth acquire the right skills to compete for jobs. Throughout these and other interventions, emphasis is placed on community-driven and participative processes to ensure voice and citizen engagement as key channels for inclusion.ReferencesBeegle, K., L. Christianensen, A. Dabalen, and I. Gaddis (2016): Poverty in A Rising Africa. Washington DC: World Bank.Botha, Anneli (2014): Radicalization in Kenya – Recruitment to al-Shabaab and the Mombasa Republican Council. ISS Paper 265. Pretoria: Institute for Security Studies.Disrupt Africa (2017): Disrupt Africa African Tech Startups Funding Report 2016.Kenya Bureau of Statistics (2014): Socio-Economic Atlas of Kenya – Depicting the National Population Census by County and Sub-Location. Nairobi: Kenya Bureau of Statistics.Mitra, S., A. Posarac, B. Vick (2011): Disability and Poverty in Developing Countries – A Snapshot from the World Health Survey. Washington DC: World Bank.Mitra, S., A. Posarac, and B. Vick (2013): Disability and Poverty in Developing Countries: A Multidimensional Study. World Development, 41, 1-18.Peterman, A., T. Palermo, and Cc Bredenkamp (2011): Estimates and Determinants of Sexual Violence Against Women in the Democratic Republic of Congo. American Journal of Public Health 101 (6): 1060 - 1067.Sanghi, A., H. Onder, V. Vemuru (2016): “Yes” In My Backyard? Washington DC: World Bank.Shepherd, A., T. Mitchell, K. Lewis, A. Lenhardt, L. Jones, L. Scott, and R. Muir-Wood (2013): The Geography of Poverty, Disasters and Climate Extremes in 2030. London: Overseas Development Institute (ODI).Under the Same Sun (2013): Children With Albinism: Violence and Displacement. Dar es Salaam: Under the Same Sun.UNHCR (2017): Global Trends – Forced Displacement in 2016. Geneva: UNHCR.World Bank (2011): Gender Equality and Development – World Development Report 2012. Washington DC: World Bank.World Bank (2013a): Inclusion Matters – The Foundation for Shared Prosperity. Washington DC: World Bank.World Bank (2013b): Harnessing Urbanization to End Poverty and Boost Prosperity in Africa – An Action Agenda for Transformation. Washington DC: World Bank.World Bank (2014): Youth Employment in Sub-Saharan Africa. Washington DC: World Bank.World Bank (2015a): World Bank Gender Data Portal – Number of Maternal Deaths. Accessed October 8, 2017.World Bank (2015b): Forced Displacement and Mixed Migration in the Horn of Africa. Washington DC: World Bank.World Bank (2016a): Poverty and Shared Prosperity 2016 – Taking On Inequality. Washington DC: World Bank. World Bank (2016b): World Bank Gender Data Portal – Firms with Female Participation in Ownership. Washington DC: World Bank. Accessed October 8, 2017.World Bank (2017a): Project Appraisal Document Mali Reinsertion of Ex-Combatants Project. Washington DC: World Bank.World Bank (2017b): Africa’s Pulse – An Analysis of Issues Shaping Africa’s Economic Future. Volume 15. Washington DC: World Bank. World Health Organization (2013): Global and Regional Estimates of Violence Against Women – Prevalence and Health Effects of Intimate Partner Violence and Non-Partner Sexual Violence. Geneva: World Health Organization.   [1] According to the World Bank’s Harmonized List of Fragile Situations for fiscal year 2018. [2] Internal calculations by the Transitional Demobilization and Reintegration Program (TDRP). [3] This is an estimate of disability prevalence among working age individuals (aged 18 to 65) in 7 African countries for which comparable data from the World Health Survey (WHS) is available: Burkina Faso, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Mauritius, Zambia and Zimbabwe. 
L’inclusion sociale en Afrique : un rapide tour d’horizon
Malgré les importants progrès qu’elle a réalisés dans le cadre de la lutte contre la pauvreté, l’Afrique compte la moitié de la population mondiale extrêmement pauvre. La proportion de la population africaine vivant dans l’extrême pauvreté est tombée de 57 % en 1990 à 41 % en 2013 selon les dernières estimations (Beegle et al. 2016, Banque mondiale 2016a). Les groupes de population extrêmement pauvres seront toutefois de plus en plus concentrés sur le continent où 389 millions de personnes n’avaient toujours que moins de 1,90 dollar par jour pour vivre en 2013, soit un chiffre plus élevé que celui  enregistré pour l’ensemble des autres régions (Banque mondiale 2016a). La pauvreté recule par ailleurs plus lentement en Afrique que dans le reste du monde : l’Asie de l’Est et l’Asie du Sud affichaient des taux de pauvreté analogues dans les années 90, mais ces derniers ont considérablement diminué pour s’établir à 4 % et 15 %, respectivement (Beegle et al. 2016, Banque mondiale 2016a). Enfin, outre que les populations pauvres y sont plus nombreuses que partout ailleurs, celles-ci ont des revenus qui sont, en moyenne, nettement plus bas que le seuil d’extrême pauvreté, soit 1,90 dollar par jour (Banque mondiale 2016a). Il est donc impératif, pour mettre fin à la pauvreté dans le monde, de prendre des mesures sans plus attendre en Afrique et de considérer les actions menées à cette fin dans une perspective d’inclusion : il sera ainsi possible d’analyser la pauvreté, non pas seulement en recensant les facteurs de corrélation, mais en déterminant les causes fondamentales de la situation, en cherchant à savoir pourquoi certains groupes sont représentés de manière disproportionnée parmi les pauvres et pourquoi certains membres de la population n’ont pas un accès à des services, notamment  d’éducation et de santé. L’inclusion sociale s’entend du processus visant à améliorer les conditions dans lesquelles les individus et les groupes peuvent participer à la vie de la société (Banque mondiale 2013a). Les membres de la population participent à la vie de la société dans trois domaines interconnectés : les marchés  (du travail, du logement, du crédit, etc.), les services (alimentation en électricité, santé, éducation, approvisionnement en eau, etc.) et les espaces (politiques, culturels, physiques, sociaux, etc.). Il est nécessaire, pour améliorer les conditions de leur participation, de renforcer leurs capacités, de leur donner de plus amples opportunités et de leur permettre de vivre dans la dignité. L’identité est le principal facteur d’exclusion sociale. Les individus et les groupes sont exclus ou inclus selon leur identité. Les identités qui sont le plus souvent cause d’exclusion sont le sexe, le genre, la race, la caste, l’ethnicité, la religion, l’âge, le statut professionnel, le lieu de résidence et le handicap. L’exclusion sociale motivée par l’un quelconque de ces facteurs peut abaisser le statut social, ce qui va souvent de pair avec des revenus moins élevés, des dotations en capital humain plus faibles, un accès à l’emploi et aux services plus limité et peu de possibilités de se faire entendre dans le cadre des processus de prise de décision aux niveaux national et local. En Afrique, l’exclusion sociale se manifeste de diverses manières, mais certaines sont plus notables que d’autres : Le nombre de jeunes augmente rapidement en Afrique, et cette évolution offre tout autant de possibilités qu’elle pose de risques. La moitié de la population de la région a moins de 25 ans (Banque mondiale 2014). D’ici 2050, l’Afrique comptera 362 millions d’habitants âgés de 15 à 24 ans (Banque mondiale 2014). Cette forte progression offre un contraste saisissant avec la situation observée dans la région du Moyen-Orient et de l’Afrique du Nord où la taille de cette cohorte s’est stabilisée, mais aussi  en Asie de l’Est, où la Chine pèse lourdement sur les résultats et où la taille de cette cohorte devrait tomber de 350 millions en 2010 à 225 millions à l’horizon 2050 (Banque mondiale 2014). Dans un contexte caractérisé par des politiques et des programmes bien conçus, une population jeune ouvre des perspectives considérables en générant un « dividende démographique ». Au cours des 10 prochaines années, toutefois, seulement un jeune Africain sur quatre, dans le meilleur des cas, devrait trouver un emploi salarié (Banque mondiale 2014). Ce manque de débouchés non seulement compromet la réalisation du dividende démographique, mais peut aussi, dans le pire des cas, promouvoir la radicalisation et la violence. Selon une étude réalisée au Kenya, par exemple, 57 des membres d’al-Shabaab qui ont été interrogés se sont joints à ce groupe avant d’avoir 24 ans (Botha 2014). Les femmes ont, en Afrique, des possibilités qui sont en grande partie limitées par la violence et l’insécurité. Quarante-six pour cent des femmes du continent subissent des violences sexuelles d’une personne autre que leur partenaire, des violences physiques et sexuelles de leurs partenaires, ou les deux (Organisation mondiale de la santé 2013). En République démocratique du Congo (RDC), par exemple, entre 1,7 et 1,8 million de femmes ont indiqué avoir été victimes d’un viol (Peterman et al. 2011). Il est toujours difficile d’avoir accès à des services de santé maternelle, de sorte qu’un accouchement peut être dangereux ; plus de 200 000 femmes meurent en couches chaque année en Afrique (Banque mondiale 2015a). La possibilité pour les femmes de prendre part aux décisions qui les concernent est un aspect central de nombre de ces problèmes. Au Malawi et en RDC, par exemple, 34 % et 28 % des femmes mariées, respectivement, ne participent pas aux décisions concernant l’utilisation de leurs gains (Banque mondiale 2011). En même temps, 26 % des ménages africains sont dirigés par une femme, et forment un sous-groupe particulièrement vulnérable (Beegle et al. 2016). Pourtant, l’Afrique affiche un pourcentage élevé d’entrepreneures (33 %) (Banque mondiale 2016b), ce qui témoigne des possibilités et de la résilience des femmes de la région, qui pourraient contribuer à accélérer le développement du continent. Les déplacements forcés sont un autre obstacle à l’inclusion en Afrique. La région accueillait 5,1 millions de réfugiés à la fin de 2016, soit 30 % du nombre total de réfugiés à l’échelle mondiale (HCR 2017), par suite de conflits, de persécutions, de violations des droits de l’homme, de catastrophes naturelles et de défaillances de la gouvernance. Si les réfugiés sont tributaires de l’aide et obligés de vivre dans des camps, les communautés d’accueil, qui habitent dans des régions isolées et sous-développées à proximité des frontières, comptent, elles aussi, parmi les plus pauvres et les plus en butte à l’exclusion dans leur propre pays. Le comté de Turkana au Kenya, par exemple, où se trouve le camp de réfugiés de Kakuma, affiche un taux de pauvreté de 88 % alors que la moyenne nationale est de 45 % (Kenya Bureau of Statistics 2014). La présence prolongée de réfugiés accroît encore les difficultés rencontrées par les communautés d’accueil, par exemple en provoquant une forte dégradation de l’environnement qui a des répercussions considérables sur les moyens de subsistance. Elle a toutefois aussi des effets positifs : le produit régional brut (PRB) de Turkana a augmenté de manière permanente de 3,4 % et l’emploi a progressé de 2,9 % au total par suite de la présence des réfugiés. Les indicateurs de la consommation  à proximité du camp sont plus élevés de 35 % dans un rayon de 5 km que dans d’autres parties du comté (Sanghi et al. 2016). Il est possible de promouvoir un développement inclusif en faveur des réfugiés et des populations d’accueil en prenant les mesures nécessaires. Les conflits prolongés qui sévissent dans la région ont créé un autre groupe de population risquant d’être exclu de la société, à savoir les ex-combattants. Vingt pays de la région sont classés dans la catégorie des pays fragiles ou touchés par un conflit[1]. La corne de l’Afrique et la région des Grands Lacs sont le théâtre de conflits depuis plus de 20 ans. Selon les estimations de la Banque mondiale, en 2015, l’Afrique comptait 194 000 combattants dans des groupes armés[2]. Une étude des mouvements armés au Mali, réalisées à la demande du Programme transitoire de démobilisation et de réintégration (TDRP), qui est administré par la Banque, montre que les jeunes constituent la majorité des ex-combattants, et que 79 % de ces derniers ont entre 18 et 40 ans. La plupart des ex-combattants interrogés sont mariés (76,7 %), et 67,4 % d’entre eux ont entre 6 et 10 personnes à leur charge, ce qui témoigne de la nécessité impérative de leur fournir un soutien et de les réinsérer dans la société (Banque mondiale 2017a). En Afrique, près d’un adulte en âge de travailler sur dix souffre d’un handicap (Mitra et al. 2013) [3]. Les personnes handicapées affichent fréquemment un taux d’achèvement des études primaires et un taux d’emploi plus faibles que les personnes non handicapées. Sur les sept pays africains pour lesquels des données comparables émanant de l’Enquête sur la santé dans le monde sont disponibles, les écarts les plus élevés entre les deux groupes sont enregistrés par Maurice en ce qui concerne le nombre moyen d’années de scolarité (23 %), et par le Malawi en ce qui concerne le taux d’achèvement des études primaires (33 %) (Mitra et al. 2011). Les personnes handicapées ont un accès plus limité aux services en raison, fréquemment, de la stigmatisation et de la discrimination dont elles font l’objet et qui, dans les cas extrêmes, peuvent mettre leur vie en danger. Les personnes atteintes d’albinisme, par exemple, sont en butte à des mythes dangereux dans plusieurs régions d’Afrique : certains croient que ce sont des fantômes – et non des êtres humains – et que la possession de parties de leur corps peut être source de richesse et porter chance (Under the Same Sun 2014). En Tanzanie, ces conceptions culturelles ont entraîné la mort de 72 personnes atteintes d’albinisme (cas recensés) entre 2007 et 2013 (Under the Same Sun 2014). L’évolution actuelle de la situation en Afrique contribue aux problèmes de l’exclusion. La population extrêmement pauvre s’est accrue de 100 millions de personnes en Afrique, notamment par suite de la croissance démographique, même si elle a diminué en proportion de la population totale (Beegle et al. 2016). Les inégalités sont de surcroît source de difficultés : sept des dix pays affichant les inégalités les plus criantes se trouvent en Afrique (Beegle et al. 2016). La région connaît aussi un rapide processus d’urbanisation puisque les villes comptent chaque jour 40 000 personnes de plus : la population urbaine devrait s’accroître de plus de 450 millions de personnes entre 2010 et 2040, lorsque la moitié de la population africaine vivra en zone urbaine (Banque mondiale 2013b). Bien que l’urbanisation crée des possibilités et une demande de mobilité sociale, et qu’elle modifie les normes et les valeurs, elle est aussi source de polarisation : environ 70 % de la population urbaine africaine vit dans des établissements informels (Banque mondiale 2013b). Enfin, le changement climatique a des répercussions sur les plus pauvres : selon les estimations, d’ici 2030 jusqu’à 110 millions de personnes extrêmement pauvres subiront des sécheresses, des inondations et des périodes de chaleur extrême en Afrique (Shepherd et al. 2013). Il est toutefois possible de saisir certaines opportunités pour promouvoir un développement inclusif en Afrique. Le taux de croissance économique moyen de la région, qui s’est établi à 4,5 % par an au cours des 20 dernières années, est remarquablement robuste (Beegle et al. 2016). La technologie ouvre des perspectives en permettant d’atteindre les personnes les plus vulnérables : le nombre de connexions téléphoniques fixes et mobiles est passé de 3 pour 1 000 personnes en 1990 à 736 pour 1 000 en 2014, tandis que la proportion d’internautes est passée de 1,3 % en 2005 à 16,7 % en 2015 (Banque mondiale 2017b). Le sens de l’innovation et l’esprit d’entreprise peuvent aussi contribuer à aider la population à sortir de la pauvreté et de l’exclusion : les jeunes entreprises technologiques ont levé plus de 129 millions de dollars en 2016, et le nombre de celles qui obtiennent des financements a augmenté de 16,8 % par rapport à l’année précédente, selon les données compilées par Disrupt Africa (Disrupt Africa 2017). La Banque mondiale, conjointement à ses partenaires, exploite les opportunités qui s’offrent de promouvoir une Afrique plus inclusive en procédant à des analyses, en poursuivant des opérations et en formulant des stratégies. À titre d’exemple, un projet régional couvrant l’Éthiopie, l’Ouganda, Djibouti et le Kenya exploite les informations produites par les études des déplacements forcés dans la Corne de l’Afrique pour faire face aux besoins des communautés d’accueil en matière de services, de moyens de subsistance et de viabilité environnementale. Un nouveau projet mené au Nigéria visera à autonomiser les femmes sur le plan économique tandis que des interventions poursuivies dans la région des Grands Lacs et en Ouganda ont été conçues pour prévenir la violence sexiste et y remédier. Le laboratoire d’innovation sur le genre et l’égalité des sexes en Afrique procède à des évaluations des impacts en considérant la dynamique des sexes et les répercussions par sexe d’une large gamme de projets dans le but d’en tirer des enseignements pour des interventions futures. Les opérations menées en RDC, en République centrafricaine, au Rwanda et au Mali avec l’appui du Programme transitoire de démobilisation et de réintégration (TDRP), soutiennent la démobilisation et la réintégration des ex-combattants, en leur assurant une formation et des moyens de gagner leur vie. Un projet de démobilisation poursuivi au Burundi vise plus particulièrement les ex-combattants handicapés et offre un exemple des activités de développement faisant place aux personnes handicapées. Au Mali, un projet de renforcement des compétences et de promotion de l’emploi des jeunes aide ces derniers à acquérir les qualifications nécessaires pour être en mesure d’obtenir un emploi. Ces interventions, parmi d’autres, privilégient des processus à caractère participatif pilotés par les communautés pour donner à leurs membres la possibilité de se faire entendre et de participer à la vie de la société, car ce sont là des voies d’accès essentielles à l’inclusion. BibliographieBeegle, K., L. Christianensen, A. Dabalen, and I. Gaddis (2016): Poverty in A Rising Africa. Washington DC: World Bank.Botha, Anneli (2014): Radicalization in Kenya – Recruitment to al-Shabaab and the Mombasa Republican Council. ISS Paper 265. Pretoria: Institute for Security Studies.Disrupt Africa (2017): Disrupt Africa African Tech Startups Funding Report 2016.Kenya Bureau of Statistics (2014): Socio-Economic Atlas of Kenya – Depicting the National Population Census by County and Sub-Location. Nairobi: Kenya Bureau of Statistics.Mitra, S., A. Posarac, B. Vick (2011): Disability and Poverty in Developing Countries – A Snapshot from the World Health Survey. Washington DC: World Bank.Mitra, S., A. Posarac, and B. Vick (2013): Disability and Poverty in Developing Countries: A Multidimensional Study. World Development, 41, 1-18.Peterman, A., T. Palermo, and Cc Bredenkamp (2011): Estimates and Determinants of Sexual Violence Against Women in the Democratic Republic of Congo. American Journal of Public Health 101 (6): 1060 - 1067.Sanghi, A., H. Onder, V. Vemuru (2016): “Yes” In My Backyard? Washington DC: World Bank.Shepherd, A., T. Mitchell, K. Lewis, A. Lenhardt, L. Jones, L. Scott, and R. Muir-Wood (2013): The Geography of Poverty, Disasters and Climate Extremes in 2030. London: Overseas Development Institute (ODI).Under the Same Sun (2013): Children With Albinism: Violence and Displacement. Dar es Salaam: Under the Same Sun.UNHCR (2017): Global Trends – Forced Displacement in 2016. Geneva: UNHCR.World Bank (2011): Gender Equality and Development – World Development Report 2012. Washington DC: World Bank.World Bank (2013a): Inclusion Matters – The Foundation for Shared Prosperity. Washington DC: World Bank.World Bank (2013b): Harnessing Urbanization to End Poverty and Boost Prosperity in Africa – An Action Agenda for Transformation. Washington DC: World Bank.World Bank (2014): Youth Employment in Sub-Saharan Africa. Washington DC: World Bank.World Bank (2015a): World Bank Gender Data Portal – Number of Maternal Deaths. Accessed October 8, 2017.World Bank (2015b): Forced Displacement and Mixed Migration in the Horn of Africa. Washington DC: World Bank.World Bank (2016a): Poverty and Shared Prosperity 2016 – Taking On Inequality. Washington DC: World Bank. World Bank (2016b): World Bank Gender Data Portal – Firms with Female Participation in Ownership. Washington DC: World Bank. Accessed October 8, 2017.World Bank (2017a): Project Appraisal Document Mali Reinsertion of Ex-Combatants Project. Washington DC: World Bank.World Bank (2017b): Africa’s Pulse – An Analysis of Issues Shaping Africa’s Economic Future. Volume 15. Washington DC: World Bank. World Health Organization (2013): Global and Regional Estimates of Violence Against Women – Prevalence and Health Effects of Intimate Partner Violence and Non-Partner Sexual Violence. Geneva: World Health Organization.   [1] Selon la liste harmonisée des situations fragiles établie par la Banque mondiale pour l’exercice 18 qui se trouve sur le site Harmonized List of Fragile Situations for fiscal year 2018. [2] Calculs effectués par les services du Programme transitoire de démobilisation et de réintégration (TDRP). [3] Ce chiffre est une estimation de la prévalence des handicaps chez les personnes en âge de travailler (18 à 65 ans) dans sept pays africains pour lesquels des données comparables émanant de l'Enquête sur la santé dans le monde sont disponibles : Burkina Faso, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Maurice, Zambie et Zimbabwe. 
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