Login
Password
Sources on this Page

> Headlines by Category

 Home / Regional / North America / United States / Ohio

You are using the plain HTML view, switch to advanced view for a more complete experience.

Manufacturing in U.S. expands at fastest pace since August 2014
The Institute for Supply Management's index climbed to 57.7, the sixth straight advance, from 56 a month earlier, the Tempe, Ariz.-based group's report showed Wednesday, March 1. Readings above 50 indicate growth. The median forecast in a Bloomberg survey of economists was 56.2.
StreamLink Software names CFO with significant tech background
Fred Binstock is the new chief financial officer at the Cleveland-based producer of grant-management software for nonprofit and public sector institutions. He previously worked at TOA Technologies and Radisphere Radiology.
U.S. consumers spend less than forecast as inflation bites
The 0.2% advance in spending followed a 0.5% increase in the prior month, the Commerce Department reported on Wednesday, March 1, in Washington. The median forecast in a Bloomberg survey called for a 0.3% gain. Incomes rose 0.4%, though inflation-adjusted disposable incomes had the biggest drop since 2013.
Thirteen things to do in Cleveland through March 8
On tap: Jessica Lang Dance at Playhouse Square, the Cleveland Orchestra performing Bernstein and Copland at Severance Hall, regional premieres of 'A Great Wilderness' at the Beck Center and 'The Flick' at Dobama Theatre, 'How I Learned to Drive' from the Cleveland Play House, Los Campesinos! at the Grog Shop, a Cleveland Council on World Affairs program on the Middle East, and more.
Banyan Technology completes $7 million fundraising round
The freight management software company in Elyria said the funded included 'a combination of equity, venture debt and commercial financing,' with support from Cleveland-based venture development organization JumpStart Inc. and alternative lender River SaaS Capital.
Materion Corp. completes $30 million acquisition of Germany's Heraeus Group
The Mayfield Heights-based advanced materials supplier said the purchase strengthens its position in precious and non-precious target materials for the architectural and automotive glass, photovoltaic, display and semiconductor markets.
Kevin Durant's knee injury is significant, but it doesn't derail Warriors' title hopes
The announcement that Durant will miss more than a month because of a sprained knee has resulted in quite a few victory laps by Cavs Twitter. Our response: Slow down, guys.
National Head Start leader cancels Cleveland visit; reiterates support for CEOGC director
National Head Start Association executive director Yasmina Vinci stayed in Washington, D.C., to analyze President Donald Trump's speech to Congress, but she appeared to side with Jacklyn Chisholm in the turmoil surrounding the Council for Economic Opportunities in Greater Cleveland.
Arkansas Gov signs proclamations that could lead to eight executions in less than two weeks in next month

There has so far been only four executions nationwide in 2017.  The just concluded month of February had no executions, and this Death Penalty Information Center list of upcoming executions suggests that there are only two serious execution dates (both in Texas) for March.  But this local article from Arkansas, headlined "Arkansas Governor schedules execution dates for 8 inmates," the Natural State could be poised for a record-setting April. Here are the details:

Arkansas’ governor on Monday set execution dates over a 10-day period in an attempt to resume the death penalty after a nearly 12-year hiatus, even though the state lacks one of three drugs needed to put the men to death.  Gov. Asa Hutchinson signed proclamations scheduling double-executions on four days in April for the eight inmates.  The quick schedule appears aimed at putting the inmates to death before another one of the state’s lethal injection drugs expire, and if carried out would mark the first time in nearly two decades a state has executed that many inmates in a month.

The move comes just days after the state’s attorney general told the governor the inmates had exhausted their appeals and there were no more legal obstacles to their executions. “This action is necessary to fulfill the requirement of the law, but it is also important to bring closure to the victims’ families who have lived with the court appeals and uncertainty for a very long time,” Hutchinson said in a statement.

The U.S. Supreme Court last week rejected the inmates’ request to review a state court ruling that upheld Arkansas’ lethal injection law. The state Supreme Court on Friday lifted the stay on its ruling, clearing the way for Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge to request the dates be set. Arkansas hasn’t executed an inmate since 2005 due to legal challenges and difficulties obtaining execution drugs.

The state’s supply of potassium chloride — one of three drugs used in lethal injections — expired in January. A prison system spokesman said Monday that the drug hasn’t been replaced, but Hutchinson’s office said officials were confident they could obtain more. And the state’s supply of midazolam lists an April 2017 expiration date, which pharmacy experts say is commonly accepted to mean the end of the month.  The state’s supply of vecuronium bromide expires on March 1, 2018.

The inmates late Friday filed an amended complaint in state court aimed at blocking the executions, again arguing the lethal injection law and the three-drug protocol are unconstitutional.  Attorneys for the inmates argued Monday in a letter to Hutchinson that the state Supreme Court’s stay is in place until that complaint is resolved. They said the current protocol “is almost certain to cause the prisoners excruciating suffering.”...

Since the U.S. Supreme Court reinstated the death penalty in 1976, only Texas has put eight people to death in a month — doing it twice in 1997.  Arkansas has had multiple executions in the past, including triple executions in 1994 and 1997.  At the time, the state Correction Department said multiple executions reduced stress on prison staff.

For a host of reasons, I will be surprised if Arkansas is able to move forward with eight executions over the last two weeks of April. But these developments certainly signal that the state is serious about getting its machinery of death up and running again ASAP.

Justices seem disinclined to limit federal judicial sentencing discretion in Dean

The US Supreme Court yesterday heard oral argument in Dean v. United States.  The case will resolve a circuit split over whether federal district judges, when sentencing a defendant convicted of firearms offenses under 18 U.S.C. § 924(c) that carry lengthy consecutive mandatory-minimum terms, may significantly reduce the sentence for underlying predicate offenses because of the firearm mandates.  The oral argument transcript, available here, is a interesting read for a bunch of reasons.  And I have a little summary of the argument posted here at SCOTUSblog.  Here is how that posting starts: 

It has now been more than a year since Justice Antonin Scalia passed away, but his jurisprudential spirit seemed to fill the courtroom yesterday as the Supreme Court heard oral argument in Dean v. United States At issue in Dean is whether a trial judge, when sentencing a defendant convicted of firearms offenses under 18 U.S.C. § 924(c) that carry lengthy consecutive mandatory-minimum terms, may significantly reduce the sentence for underlying predicate offenses because of the severity of the mandated consecutive sentences.  During the oral argument, several justices endorsed the government’s contention that allowing a judge to give a nominal sentence for the underlying predicate offenses in these circumstances would largely negate Congress’ purpose in enacting Section 924(c).  But, echoing statutory interpretation principles that Scalia often championed in federal criminal cases, the justices also stressed that the text of the applicable sentencing statutes did not clearly foreclose the trial judge’s exercise of judicial sentencing discretion.  This textualist point may carry the day for the defendant. 

Post Selected Items to:

Showing 10 items of about 4800

home  •   advertising  •   terms of service  •   privacy  •   about us  •   contact us  •   press release design by Popshop •   © 1999-2017 NewsKnowledge