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Blockchain da Graft lança sua mainnet antes do programado

Blockchain da Graft lança sua mainnet antes do programado (PRNewsfoto/Graft Blockchain)DALLAS, 21 de janeiro de 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- A Graft, primeira rede de blockchain global de gateway de pagamentos de código aberto, designada para Pontos de Venda, agiu antes do programado e lançou sua mainnet (rede principal) em 16 de janeiro de 2018, antes do início da Oferta Inicial...


En una demostración de apoyo, Koons of Silver Spring ofrece cambio de aceite y servicios gratis a vehículos a todos los empleados del gobierno federal durante el cierre del gobierno federal en 2018

Koons of Silver Spring - Ford Lincoln MazdaSILVER SPRING, Maryland, 21 de enero de 2018 /PRNewswire-HISPANIC PR WIRE/ -- Koons of Silver Spring, un importante concesionario de automóviles en las afueras de Washington DC, está ofreciendo cambios de aceite, rotación de llantas e inspecciones gratis a todos los empleados del gobierno...


Minnesotan Amanda Trunzo Dominates Red Bull Crashed Ice Saint Paul

 (PRNewsfoto/Red Bull)SAINT PAUL, Minn., Jan. 21, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- On its seventh consecutive return to Saint Paul, Red Bull Crashed Ice once again delivered a memorable night of intense action, athleticism and adrenaline in front of tens of thousands of fans. Amanda Trunzo, a hometown favorite,...


Joe Ingles takes and makes a lot of shots — at hoop and humorously at his teammate — in career-tying night

SALT LAKE CITY — During an in-arena TV interview after Saturday’s game, Joe Ingles jokingly accused Rudy Gobert of being a ballhog.

“He wants the ball every time, which is annoying,” Ingles said, tongue-in-cheek, of the center who’s played well in two games since a 15-game absence. “But, hey, he’s been good for us.”

Gobert didn’t hear the sarcastic barb, but, coincidentally, the French center had some fun at the 30-year-old small forward’s expense in the locker room after the Jazz beat the Los Angeles Clippers 125-113 at Vivint Arena.

“When he asks for the ball, he can score,” Gobert said of Ingles, who tied his career-high with 21 points against the team that waived him before Utah picked him up. “Hopefully, he can do it every game now — just shoot the ball.”

That, by the way, wasn’t the jesting jab.

Ingles did shoot the heck out of the ball in the first three quarters, hitting 5 of 9 3-pointers while scoring all 21 of his points. The small forward’s strong play — he also had four steals, three rebounds and two assists through three quarters — helped spark Utah to a game-high 25-point lead before settling on a 104-87 advantage heading into the final 12 minutes of action.

The Jazz, by the way, came into this contest averaging just 101.3 points per 48-minute game, so the Ingles-assisted explosion on the tail end of a back-to-back set was quite the nice surprise.

The Jazz pointed to unselfish ball movement as being a key to the offensive fireworks, which included the Jazz scoring a season-best 76 points in the first half. That was the most they’ve scored in a half all season and just the second time they eclipsed the 70-point mark in a half.

“When the ball sticks or stays on one side of the floor, we’re not going to be as efficient,” Jazz coach Quin Snyder said when asked about Ingles’s big night. “We’re a team that needs the ball to move side to side, and, when it does, Joe’s usually involved in helping it move, and he’s the beneficiary lot of times of that movement.”

Ingles is doing a little bit of everything for the Jazz this season after signing a four-year, $52 million deal this past offseason. But he hasn’t been a consistently high-quantity shooter or scorer, averaging 9.4 points on 7.7 shots per game, because rookie Donovan Mitchell has filled the offensive void left by Gordon Hayward’s departure.

Both wings had strong offensive outings on this night, with Mitchell scoring a team-high 23 and Ingles having his first 20-point game of the season. His previous season-high was 19 against Oklahoma City back in October.

“He was ready to shoot it, was aggressive,” Snyder said of Ingles, who matched a career-high he set when scoring 21 against Golden State on Dec. 8, 2016. “Particularly early, I thought he gave us a real lift to see the ball go in the basket with some timely threes.”

Ingles returned to the starting lineup in this game after agreeing to come off the bench to shake things up on Friday night. Rodney Hood didn’t play because of a lower leg contusion, so Ingles started for the 45th time in 46 games.

Gobert, for one, was happy to see him take as many shots as he did. Ingles hit 8 of 15 shots overall.

The Stifle Tower chuckled when a reporter asked if he’s among the players who yells for Ingles to shoot more often. He wants that, for sure.

“Except when I’m on the court,” Gobert said. “When I’m on the court, I want him to pass.”

After wins, everybody humorously says they want something different from somebody else on the team. Even Snyder offered proof of that.

“Rudy’s an offensive center,” the Jazz joked when it was mentioned the Jazz had scored 115 and 125 since his return. “I’d like to see him start defending.”

If that includes giving the ball up to his Aussie teammate on occasion, Ingles would be all for that.

EMAIL: jody@desnews.com TWITTER: DJJazzyJody

Led by Donovan Mitchell, Utah Jazz bounce back with offensive fireworks in victory over Clippers

SALT LAKE CITY -- After Friday night’s tough two-point loss to New York, Donovan Mitchell brightened up when he was asked if it was good to be playing less than 24 hours later against the L.A. Clippers.

“Yes, 100 percent,” Donovan replied.

Mitchell was anxious to put one of his poorer performances of late in the rear-view mirror after he made just 7 of 21 shots and committed five turnovers in the disappointing defeat.

The rookie from Louisville did just that with a 23-point performance on 9-of-16 shooting, while dishing out seven assists and leading the Jazz to a 125-113 victory at Vivint Arena Saturday night.

But Mitchell wasn’t the only one who bounced back from Friday as the Jazz put together one of their best offensive performances in a long time with all five starters scoring in double figures and shooting 54.9 percent from the field as a team.

Joe Ingles, who was back in the starting lineup after a one-game hiatus, scored a career-high 21 points with five 3-pointers. Derrick Favors had a double-double with 14 points and 12 rebounds. Rudy Gobert in just his second game back after sitting out 15 games with a leg injury, had 14 points and three blocked shots, while Ricky Rubio scored 12 points.

Then there was Alec Burks, who came back from a pair of DNP-CDs (the coach didn’t play him) with a strong game off the bench, finishing with 15 points and six rebounds in 18 minutes.

“It was good to see the ball go in the basket,” said Jazz coach Quin Snyder. “I think the ball really moved. In the first half, we attacked the rim – guys were committed to attacking. If you do that, you have an opportunity to break a defense down.”

Mitchell, despite his offensive heroics, still plays like a rookie at times and he made up for a rookie mistake with perhaps the play of the game after the Clippers had cut a 25-point lead down to seven with 1:32 left

Mitchell put up an ill-advised 3-pointer with 18 seconds still on the shot clock, which Milos Teodosic rebounded. Suddenly, Mitchell stepped in front of a pass by Teodosic and went in for any easy layup to give Utah some breathing room.

Clippers’ coach Doc Rivers called it one of the key plays of the night and the humble Mitchell couldn’t help but agree.

“It changed the energy after the terrible three that I took,” Mitchell said. “I didn’t think he was going to pass it and I just stood there and waited. I guess he didn’t see me until the last second. My intention was to get back, but he made the pass and I guess I was in the right place at the right time.”

Early on, it looked the Jazz were going to blow the Clippers right out of the gym. Even though the Clips had come in as one of the hottest teams in the NBA with 12 wins in their last 15 games, including six in a row, it was the Jazz who came out with the most energy in leading from the opening tip and never trailing.

The Jazz led 39-29 after one quarter and increased the lead to 76-59 by halftime, scoring 12 more points than their previous best first half total this year. The Jazz shot 68.2 percent in the second quarter and finished the half at 62.5 percent.

The lead got as high as 25 midway through the third quarter at 94-69 before the Jazz started getting careless with the ball and the Clippers started making shots. Los Angeles cut 10 points off the lead in just a couple of minutes, but the Jazz pushed the lead back to 104-87 at the end of the quarter.

L.A. pulled within eight at 108-100 midway through the fourth, but the Jazz hung on, thanks to Mitchell’s steal and some timely free throws down the stretch (8 of 12 in the final four minutes).

The Clippers’ big two, Blake Griffin and Lou Williams, scored 25 and 31 points, respectively, while Wes Johnson scored 17 off the bench and former Jazzman Tyrone Wallace added 12.

“Honestly we just didn’t have it,” said Rivers. “I thought they played a lot harder than us, which I rarely say. I just thought they played great tonight.”

Now the Jazz, who improved to 19-27, will hit the road for three games beginning Monday at Atlanta. Then they’ll play at Detroit Wednesday before playing at Toronto Friday.

5 cannabis-related bills to be introduced this year, but none as sweeping as ballot initiative

SALT LAKE CITY — The ballot initiative campaign seeking to legalize the medical use of cannabis in Utah is expected to have enough signatures by early next month, and state legislators are pursuing their own bills affecting the commercial, research and patient access to the drug.

The Utah Patients Coalition campaign is expected to reach the required 113,000 threshold for the number of ballot signatures by early February, campaign director DJ Schanz said.

Rep. Brad Daw, R-Orem, and Sen. Evan Vickers, R-Cedar City, are pursuing an assortment of bills related to the plant, but neither they nor the Utah Patients Coalition seem to have much interest in seeking out comprehensive legalization that would nullify the need for an initiative vote in November.

"Our main priority is to move forward with the ballot initiative," Schanz said, adding that the campaign's intent "is not to cry wolf and then come in with the idea to negotiate with the Legislature."

Instead, the focus would be on negotiations following the initiative passing, if that were to happen.

"There's going to be some bureaucratic reforms and tightening up some loose ends, and we'd be happy to do that with the Legislature in 2019 after this passes," Schanz said.

Vickers agreed that would be likely the timing of any extensive deliberations with those who ran the campaign.

"If they pass (the initiative), the Legislature is actually going to have to sit down and work with the advocates and those who got it passed to work out some of the issues," he said.

Vickers said he will pursue a bill this legislative session that would require the state Department of Agriculture to regulate the sale of CBD oil and also obtain a waiver from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration allowing physicians to be able to prescribe CBD oil products of various forms to their patients.

The sale of such oil is technically prohibited under United States law, Vickers said, but he has received encouraging signs from federal authorities that "there's a real possibility" the waiver could be granted.

Although it is illegal in theory, CBD oil is sold throughout Utah, Vickers said. He wants to require that it be regulated at the state level so authorities could have the ability to discipline and stop any seller currently violating the law by selling CBD oil that is high in THC content, or is even "found to be laced with Spice."

THC is the ingredient in marijuana that has psychoactive effects, while CBD is not believed to have any such effects.

"No. 1, how do we protect the public? No. 2, how do we utilize (CBD oil for) medicinal purposes?" Vickers said of the reasons of his bill.

Daw will be introducing four bills touching the cannabis issue, including one that would give patients who are using hospice care, have six months or less to live, or have been diagnosed with a terminal illness to use medical cannabis extracts. He described the measure as a "right-to-try" bill.

"(It's for when) they've exhausted all other methods of treatment, and a physician determines this is the only possibility they have for something to be done … to get relief," Daw said.

Besides providing terminally ill patients relief, the bill would also set up parameters for their experiences to be researched, he said.

"And we get the knowledge base, so in the future it becomes a lot easier to say we have a good idea that this works," Daw said.

Christine Stenquist, founder of Together for Responsible Use and Cannabis Education, or TRUCE, says the idea of a right-to-try bill is bewildering to her.

"Quality of life means something. Don't offer this to me in hospice," Stenquist said.

But Daw believes that the measure, in conjunction with his other bills and the legislation proposed by Vickers, is "getting almost every legitimate patient some access."

"I believe that this will (give) access to every to legitimate patient to legitimate medicine," he said. "If the concern is getting access to patients, then this package of bills is specifically designed to do this."

That package of bills includes a measure that would allow the state Department of Agriculture to produce "full-strength cannabis" on behalf of research, Daw said. The idea, he said, is to create "a great environment where we can do real first-class research."

Last year, the Legislature set aside $500,000 for a clinical study examining the effects of cannabis on pain, to be carried out by the Utah Science Technology and Research Initiative with the help of University of Utah researchers.

Despite hopes that results for the study might be ready by the beginning of the upcoming legislative session, the process has been slow, said Ivy Estabrooke, executive director of the Utah Science Technology and Research Initiative.

Because it took so long to get the shipment of the drug approved, Estabrooke said, it will not be arriving until next week. She said she hopes some preliminary results will be available by the time the final days of the session arrive.

"Getting the drug is the last hurdle," Estabrooke said. "(Researchers) do have some research subjects screened and ready to be entered into the study."

Full results are expected to be completed by late June or early July, she said.

Calls for more research have been at the heart of the Utah Medical Association's opposition to medical cannabis legalization in recent years. The Utah Patients Coalition contends that an overwhelming body of research exists internationally and that calling for more studies is a delay tactic by legislators.

Daw's fourth bill makes a minor adjustment to the membership of the state-appointed Cannabinoid Product Board, which is tasked with looking into existing cannabis research. It also widens the range of which products the board is asked to study.

Asked of his take on the bills proposed by Daw and Vickers, Schanz said he was hopeful that the bills would "continue to destigmatize hemp and cannabis."

However, the bills don't "do anything to give access to patients" to the full profile of the cannabis plant, which is where the initiative comes in, he said.

Daw takes strong issue with the language of the ballot initiative, saying it would make it too difficult to prosecute recreational use of cannabis and doesn't provide the state any enforcing power in ensuring only doctors of a certain type can prescribe cannabis to more than 20 percent of their patients, among other concerns.

Vickers said he wants to find a way for medical cannabis to become legal in Utah, but wants to do so more methodically than is provided for under the initiative.

5 cannabis-related bills to be introduced this year, but none as sweeping as ballot initiative

SALT LAKE CITY — The ballot initiative campaign seeking to legalize the medical use of cannabis in Utah is expected to have enough signatures by early next month, and state legislators are pursuing their own bills affecting the commercial, research and patient access to the drug.

The Utah Patients Coalition campaign is expected to reach the required 113,000 threshold for the number of ballot signatures by early February, campaign director DJ Schanz said.

Rep. Brad Daw, R-Orem, and Sen. Evan Vickers, R-Cedar City, are pursuing an assortment of bills related to the plant, but neither they nor the Utah Patients Coalition seem to have much interest in seeking out comprehensive legalization that would nullify the need for an initiative vote in November.

"Our main priority is to move forward with the ballot initiative," Schanz said, adding that the campaign's intent "is not to cry wolf and then come in with the idea to negotiate with the Legislature."

Instead, the focus would be on negotiations following the initiative passing, if that were to happen.

"There's going to be some bureaucratic reforms and tightening up some loose ends, and we'd be happy to do that with the Legislature in 2019 after this passes," Schanz said.

Vickers agreed that would be likely the timing of any extensive deliberations with those who ran the campaign.

"If they pass (the initiative), the Legislature is actually going to have to sit down and work with the advocates and those who got it passed to work out some of the issues," he said.

Vickers said he will pursue a bill this legislative session that would require the state Department of Agriculture to regulate the sale of CBD oil and also obtain a waiver from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration allowing physicians to be able to prescribe CBD oil products of various forms to their patients.

The sale of such oil is technically prohibited under United States law, Vickers said, but he has received encouraging signs from federal authorities that "there's a real possibility" the waiver could be granted.

Although it is illegal in theory, CBD oil is sold throughout Utah, Vickers said. He wants to require that it be regulated at the state level so authorities could have the ability to discipline and stop any seller currently violating the law by selling CBD oil that is high in THC content, or is even "found to be laced with Spice."

THC is the ingredient in marijuana that has psychoactive effects, while CBD is not believed to have any such effects.

"No. 1, how do we protect the public? No. 2, how do we utilize (CBD oil for) medicinal purposes?" Vickers said of the reasons of his bill.

Daw will be introducing four bills touching the cannabis issue, including one that would give patients who are using hospice care, have six months or less to live, or have been diagnosed with a terminal illness to use medical cannabis extracts. He described the measure as a "right-to-try" bill.

"(It's for when) they've exhausted all other methods of treatment, and a physician determines this is the only possibility they have for something to be done … to get relief," Daw said.

Besides providing terminally ill patients relief, the bill would also set up parameters for their experiences to be researched, he said.

"And we get the knowledge base, so in the future it becomes a lot easier to say we have a good idea that this works," Daw said.

Christine Stenquist, founder of Together for Responsible Use and Cannabis Education, or TRUCE, says the idea of a right-to-try bill is bewildering to her.

"Quality of life means something. Don't offer this to me in hospice," Stenquist said.

But Daw believes that the measure, in conjunction with his other bills and the legislation proposed by Vickers, is "getting almost every legitimate patient some access."

"I believe that this will (give) access to every to legitimate patient to legitimate medicine," he said. "If the concern is getting access to patients, then this package of bills is specifically designed to do this."

That package of bills includes a measure that would allow the state Department of Agriculture to produce "full-strength cannabis" on behalf of research, Daw said. The idea, he said, is to create "a great environment where we can do real first-class research."

Last year, the Legislature set aside $500,000 for a clinical study examining the effects of cannabis on pain, to be carried out by the Utah Science Technology and Research Initiative with the help of University of Utah researchers.

Despite hopes that results for the study might be ready by the beginning of the upcoming legislative session, the process has been slow, said Ivy Estabrooke, executive director of the Utah Science Technology and Research Initiative.

Because it took so long to get the shipment of the drug approved, Estabrooke said, it will not be arriving until next week. She said she hopes some preliminary results will be available by the time the final days of the session arrive.

"Getting the drug is the last hurdle," Estabrooke said. "(Researchers) do have some research subjects screened and ready to be entered into the study."

Full results are expected to be completed by late June or early July, she said.

Calls for more research have been at the heart of the Utah Medical Association's opposition to medical cannabis legalization in recent years. The Utah Patients Coalition contends that an overwhelming body of research exists internationally and that calling for more studies is a delay tactic by legislators.

Daw's fourth bill makes a minor adjustment to the membership of the state-appointed Cannabinoid Product Board, which is tasked with looking into existing cannabis research. It also widens the range of which products the board is asked to study.

Asked of his take on the bills proposed by Daw and Vickers, Schanz said he was hopeful that the bills would "continue to destigmatize hemp and cannabis."

However, the bills don't "do anything to give access to patients" to the full profile of the cannabis plant, which is where the initiative comes in, he said.

Daw takes strong issue with the language of the ballot initiative, saying it would make it too difficult to prosecute recreational use of cannabis and doesn't provide the state any enforcing power in ensuring only doctors of a certain type can prescribe cannabis to more than 20 percent of their patients, among other concerns.

Vickers said he wants to find a way for medical cannabis to become legal in Utah, but wants to do so more methodically than is provided for under the initiative.

Lifshitz & Miller LLP Announces Investigation of AMC Entertainment Holdings, Inc., Acuity Brands, Inc., Aradigm Corporation, Intel Corporation, SCANA Corporation, Tesaro, Inc. and Tucows Inc.

NEW YORK, Jan. 21, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- AMC Entertainment Holdings, Inc. (AMC) Lifshitz & Miller announces investigation into possible securities law violations by AMC and certain of its officers in connection with AMC's Registration Statement and Prospectus pertaining to its...


Lifshitz & Miller LLP Announces Investigation of AMC Entertainment Holdings, Inc., Acuity Brands, Inc., Aradigm Corporation, Intel Corporation, SCANA Corporation, Tesaro, Inc. and Tucows Inc.

NEW YORK, Jan. 21, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- AMC Entertainment Holdings, Inc. (AMC) Lifshitz & Miller announces investigation into possible securities law violations by AMC and certain of its officers in connection with AMC's Registration Statement and Prospectus pertaining to its...


Lifshitz & Miller LLP Announces Investigation of Advanced Micro Devices, Aflac Incorporated, DST Systems, Inc., Forum Merger Corporation, GoPro, Inc., Sucampo Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and ZAIS Group Holdings, Inc.

NEW YORK, Jan. 21, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) Lifshitz & Miller announces investigation into possible securities law violations by AMD and certain of its officers in connection with a January 11, 2018 announcement that a fundamental security flaw had...


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