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Donald Trump’s triumph is a lesson for Europe’s politicians | Simon Jenkins
Neglect voters at your peril, lest people turn to the deeply unattractive outsiders vying for their support

Donald Trump’s emergence as Republican candidate for the American presidency may yet be a blessing in disguise – albeit a heavy disguise. The reckless, belligerent, mendacious inexperience of the man is awesome. It is never good to see virtue in a bully or a thug. With no record of public service, Trump can be judged only on his private behaviour, and that is by all accounts deplorable.

Even as Trump moved into an unassailable lead over his rival, Ted Cruz, he could not resist a torrent of abuse. Cruz, he said, was a serial liar and had five extramarital affairs. His father was associated with Lee Harvey Oswald, John F Kennedy’s assassin. For good measure, Cruz retorted that Trump was “amoral, a pathological liar, narcissist and buffoon”. His father pleaded to “every member of the body of Christ to vote according to the word of God” and avoid America’s destruction at the hands of Trump.

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Cameron to propose global anti-corruption agency at summit

PM hopes body to help investigators track down tax evasion will be summit’s legacy in wake of Panama Papers

An international anti-corruption body to help law enforcement agencies and investigators track down money laundering and tax evasion is to be one of the centrepiece proposals of next week’s anti-corruption summit hosted by David Cameron.

The new international agency is likely to involve broadening the remit of the the Paris-based OECD, which is already undertaking work on bribery and international tax rules, Sir Eric Pickles, David Cameron’s anti-corruption adviser, has said.

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Western Isles' Sunday shutdown likely to fall foul of new equality law
Councillors in remote Scottish islands could be challenged over hardline religious policies banning work and play on sabbath

Councillors on the Western Isles could be forced to abandon a centuries-old religious tradition of keeping sports and community centres closed on a Sunday because it breaches new equality legislation, the Guardian has learned.

The islands of Lewis, Harris and North Uist are the last places in the UK where publicly owned and lottery-funded facilities suchas leisure centres, golf courses, school grounds and community halls are closed because of sabbatarianism, which bans work and play on Sundays on religious grounds.

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Cameron to propose global anti-corruption agency at summit

PM hopes body to help investigators track down tax evasion will be summit’s legacy in wake of Panama Papers

An international anti-corruption body to help law enforcement agencies and investigators track down money laundering and tax evasion is to be one of the centrepiece proposals of next week’s anti-corruption summit hosted by David Cameron.

The new international agency is likely to involve broadening the remit of the the Paris-based OECD, which is already undertaking work on bribery and international tax rules, Sir Eric Pickles, David Cameron’s anti-corruption adviser, has said.

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How we got to Trump: blame game begins among fellow Republicans

Eleven months ago, the businessman’s candidacy seemed like a sideshow; now, he’s the likely GOP presidential nominee. How did the country get here?

As the news sinks in, a palpable sense of shock is settling over much of America of the sort normally reserved for the day after major natural disasters. Donald Trump, the real estate tycoon once known primarily for his mop of orange hair, perma-tan and catchphrase “You’re fired!”, has become the presumptive presidential nominee of the Republican party.

The country, including many top figures within the GOP itself, is struggling to come to terms with the unthinkable, the unconscionable, the downright preposterous: in theory, Trump is now one short hop away from the White House. To say that the news has unsettled the party of which he is now the nominal head would be a gross understatement – thunderstruck, flabbergasted or devastated would be closer to the mark.

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The Guardian view on Cameron’s offer to refugee children: it’s the least he could do | Editorial
The prime minister bowed to the threat of defeat. Some lone child refugees will be given a home in the UK. It is a welcome concession, but not nearly enough

David Cameron has bowed to backbench pressure as well as something like national moral anguish, and announced that Britain will take in some unaccompanied child refugees. It is a welcome and long-overdue concession. But the policy shift is hedged about with restrictions that may mean it turns out to be worth less than meets the eye. And in an equal and opposite move, moments after the prime minister’s announcement, the home office minister James Brokenshire came to the House of Commons to tell MPs that Britain would play no part in any new EU proposal to penalise countries that did not take a proportion of the refugees arriving on the continent. Regrettably, Mr Cameron’s concession on child refugees does not signal anything like a rethink of refugee policy.

The new approach to children is a minimalist, pragmatic response to overwhelming pressure. That is typical of most of the government’s attitude to the refugee crisis. Every concession, even when protecting vulnerable children has been the aim, has been wrung from it. The emphasis has been on the obstacles in the path of success. This instinct might usefully be applied to other government projects. But it is stony-hearted when applied to desperate and traumatised people fleeing a war zone.

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Cameron to propose global anti-corruption agency at summit

PM hopes body to help investigators track down tax evasion will be summit’s legacy in wake of Panama Papers

An international anti-corruption body to help law enforcement agencies and investigators track down money laundering and tax evasion is to be one of the centrepiece proposals of next week’s anti-corruption summit hosted by David Cameron.

The new international agency is likely to involve broadening the remit of the the Paris-based OECD, which is already undertaking work on bribery and international tax rules, Sir Eric Pickles, David Cameron’s anti-corruption adviser, has said.

Continue reading...
The Guardian view on Cameron’s offer to refugee children: it’s the least he could do | Editorial
The prime minister bowed to the threat of defeat. Some lone child refugees will be given a home in the UK. It is a welcome concession, but not nearly enough

David Cameron has bowed to backbench pressure as well as something like national moral anguish, and announced that Britain will take in some unaccompanied child refugees. It is a welcome and long-overdue concession. But the policy shift is hedged about with restrictions that may mean it turns out to be worth less than meets the eye. And in an equal and opposite move, moments after the prime minister’s announcement, the home office minister James Brokenshire came to the House of Commons to tell MPs that Britain would play no part in any new EU proposal to penalise countries that did not take a proportion of the refugees arriving on the continent. Regrettably, Mr Cameron’s concession on child refugees does not signal anything like a rethink of refugee policy.

The new approach to children is a minimalist, pragmatic response to overwhelming pressure. That is typical of most of the government’s attitude to the refugee crisis. Every concession, even when protecting vulnerable children has been the aim, has been wrung from it. The emphasis has been on the obstacles in the path of success. This instinct might usefully be applied to other government projects. But it is stony-hearted when applied to desperate and traumatised people fleeing a war zone.

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John Kasich to quit Republican race, leaving Trump last man standing

Day after Donald Trump all but sealed the nomination with a win in the Indiana primary, Kasich is to follow Ted Cruz in bowing out of the field

Resistance to Donald Trump’s capture of the Republican party crumbled on Wednesday as his sole remaining opponent conceded there was no chance of preventing the New York businessman from becoming the party’s presidential nominee.

In chaotic scenes just hours after Trump’s landslide win in the Indiana primary essentially sealed the nomination race, Ohio governor John Kasich cancelled a planned press conference outside Washington DC and prepared for a concession statement in his home state.

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Mental health champion for UK schools axed after criticising government

Department of Education denies axing of role is connected to Natasha Devon’s criticism of policies such as increased testing

The government has dropped its mental health champion for schools after she publicly criticised current education policies, in particular the testing regime which she claims is detrimental to children’s mental health.

Natasha Devon was appointed by the government last August to raise awareness and reduce the stigma surrounding young people’s mental health, as part of a wider £1.25bn drive to improve care.

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